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Books Books 1 - 10 of 17 on So there is no earthly way of finding out precisely what the whale really looks like.....  
" So there is no earthly way of finding out precisely what the whale really looks like. And the only mode in which you can derive even a tolerable idea of his living contour, is by going a whaling yourself; but by so doing, you run no small risk of being... "
Moby-Dick - Page 298
by Herman Melville - 2008 - 664 pages
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Pursuing Melville, 1940-1980: Chapters and Essays

Merton M. Sealts - Literary Criticism - 1982 - 419 pages
...waters; and afloat the vast bulk of him is out of sight, like a launched lineof-battle ship. . . . And the only mode in which you can derive even a tolerable idea of his living contour, is by going a whaling yourself; but by so doing, you run no small risk of being eternally stove and sunk by him....
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Subversive Genealogy: The Politics and Art of Herman Melville

Michael Paul Rogin - Biography & Autobiography - 1985 - 354 pages
...longing for union to an object. In the same way, since Benthamite cetology cannot depict leviathan, "[T]here is no earthly way of finding out precisely...tolerable idea of his living contour, is by going whaling yourself." (215) The failures of the observer to rejoin the living world, and to join it together,...
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American Romanticism and the Marketplace

Michael T. Gilmore - Literary Criticism - 2010 - 188 pages
"This book can take its place on the shelf beside Henry Nash Smith's Virgin Land and Leo Marx's The Machine in the Garden."—Choice "[Gilmore] demonstrates the profound ...
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Osiris N.: The Victim and the American Novel

Biyot Kesh Tripathy - Literary Criticism - 1985 - 282 pages
...creature in the world which must remain unpainted to the last" (p. 371). Not only that, there seems to be "no earthly way of finding out precisely what the whale really looks like. " Just as the cumulation leads to universalization or the loss of the empirical individuality of the...
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Melville's Later Novels

William B. Dillingham - Literary Criticism - 1986 - 430 pages
...that the great Leviathan is that one creature in the world which must remain unpainted to the last. True, one portrait may hit the mark much nearer than...finding out precisely what the whale really looks like." Of course, you might embark on a whaling voyage into the howling infinite, "but by so doing, you run...
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Hobbesian Moral and Political Theory

Gregory S. Kavka - Philosophy - 1986 - 460 pages
...is ... one creature . . . that must remain unpainted to the last. True one portrait may hit the mark nearer than another, but none can hit it with any very considerable degree of exactness." 7 A main contention of this book is that a Hobbesian analysis of morality is an illuminating one. It...
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Moby Dick, Or The Whale: Volume 6, Scholarly Edition

Herman Melville - Fiction - 1988 - 1043 pages
...that the great Leviathan is that one creature in the world which must remain unpainted to the last. True, one portrait may hit the mark much nearer than...tolerable idea of his living contour, is by going a whaling yourself; but by so doing, you run no small risk of being eternally stove and sunk by him....
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Moby Dick, Or The Whale: Volume 6, Scholarly Edition

Herman Melville - Fiction - 1988 - 1048 pages
...that the great Leviathan is that one creature in the world which must remain unpainted to the last. True, one portrait may hit the mark much nearer than...mode in which you can derive even a tolerable idea ot his living contour, is by going a whaling yourself; but by so doing, you run no small risk of being...
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Some Other World to Find: Quest and Negation in the Works of Herman Melville

Bruce Leonard Grenberg - Literary Criticism - 1989 - 240 pages
...and to "see the world" (Лf.Д 16:69), Ishmael soon discovers his own limitations, for, he confesses, "there is no earthly way of finding out precisely what the whale really looks like" (Л/.Д 55:228). Ishmael's attempts to present us with a tolerable idea of the whale's living contours,...
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George Bellows and Urban America

Marianne Doezema - Art - 1992 - 244 pages
...where Melville speaks about painting the whale, or rather, warns about the impossibility of doing so: degree of exactness. So there is no earthly way of...tolerable idea of his living contour, is by going whaling yourself; but by doing so you run no small risk of being eternally stove and sunk by him.55...
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