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Books Books 1 - 10 of 14 on I go ; yet while I earthly live, the queenly personality lives in me, and feels her....  
" I go ; yet while I earthly live, the queenly personality lives in me, and feels her royal rights. But war is pain, and hate is woe. Come in thy lowest form of love, and I will kneel and kiss thee ; but at thy highest, come as mere supernal power; and... "
Moby-Dick - Page 560
by Herman Melville - 2008 - 664 pages
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Pursuing Melville, 1940-1980: Chapters and Essays

Merton M. Sealts - Literary Criticism - 1982 - 419 pages
...will kneel and kiss thee; but at thy highest, come as mere supernal power; and though thou launchest navies of full-freighted worlds, there's that in here that still remains indifferent. . . . Light though thou be, thou leapest out of darkness; but I am darkness leaping out of light, leaping...
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Osiris N.: The Victim and the American Novel

Biyot Kesh Tripathy - Literary Criticism - 1985 - 282 pages
...unintegral mastery in me. In the midst of the personified impersonal, a personality stands here. . . . Oh, thou clear spirit, of thy fire thou madest me,...a true child of fire, I breathe it back to thee." (p. 616) In the manifest phenomena of the corposants is seen the "clear spirit of clear fire." And...
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New Essays on Moby-Dick

Richard H. Brodhead - Literary Criticism - 1986 - 184 pages
...that are most truly his own and at once harmonious with the ultimate context in which his life is set. "Oh, thou clear spirit, of thy fire thou madest me,...a true child of fire, I breathe it back to thee." Whereas the member of the elect finds the freedom of his own truest life in obedience to the divine...
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Moby Dick, Or The Whale: Volume 6, Scholarly Edition

Herman Melville - Fiction - 1988 - 1048 pages
...and kiss thee; but at thy highest, come as mere supernal power; and though thou launchest navies ot full-freighted worlds, there's that in here that still...flames leap lengthwise to thrice their previous height; Ahah, with the rest, doses his eyes, his right hand pressed hard upon them.) "I own thy speechless,...
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The Corporeal Self: Allegories of the Body in Melville and Hawthorne

Sharon Cameron - Literary Criticism - 1991 - 166 pages
...when he wishes most succor from the universe. Ahab's appeal in "The Candles" echoes Brand's words: "Oh, thou clear spirit, of thy fire thou madest me,...like a true child of fire, I breathe it back to thee. . . . Oh, thou foundling fire . . . again with haughty agony, I read my sire ... I burn with thee;...
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The Corporeal Self: Allegories of the Body in Melville and Hawthorne

Sharon Cameron - Literary Criticism - 1991 - 166 pages
...universe. Ahab's appeal in "The Candles" echoes Brand's words: "Oh, thou clear spirit, of thy fire them madest me, and like a true child of fire, I breathe it back to thee. . . . Oh, thou foundling fire . . . again with haughty agony, I read my sire ... I burn with thee;...
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Dionysus in Literature: Essays on Literary Madness

Branimir M. Rieger - Literary Criticism - 1994 - 233 pages
...nature he reserves for himself, as a representative of mankind, the right or even the duty to rebel: "of thy fire thou madest me, and like a true child of fire, I breathe it back to thee" (507). "In this matter of the whale," then, one could easily declare Ahab legitimately mad—and thereby...
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Rod Wooden Smoke and Moby Dick

Wooden - Performing Arts - 1997 - 174 pages
...midst of all things impersonal, to the last gasp of my earthquake life, a personality stands here. Oh thou clear spirit, of thy fire thou madest me,...like a true child of fire I breathe it back to thee. (He throws down the harpoon. Sudden, repeated flashes of lightning — the flames leap up in height)...
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Collected Prose

Charles Olson - Literary Collections - 1997 - 471 pages
...chains of his ship. He does it, he says, to match his blood with fire. He cries up into the night: Oh, thou clear spirit, of thy fire thou madest me,...like a true child of fire, I breathe it back to thee. (There is a myth that Prometheus did more than steal fire from the sun and bring it down to man: it...
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