Animal Physiology (Google eBook)

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H. G. Bohn, 1859 - Physiology, Comparative - 604 pages
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Page 224 - ... The tricuspid and mitral valves, which are entirely closed the two ventricles contracting simultaneously are represented by 1 and 3 respectively; while the pulmonary and aortic semilunar volves, which, when closed, always present a concave surface towards the lungs, are indicated by 4 and 5. The walls of the ventricles are much thicker than those of the auricles, and those of the left ventricle are about four times as thick as those of the right; the amount of muscular tissue being, in...
Page 288 - In order to clear the throat, place the patient gently on the face, with one wrist under the forehead, that all fluid, and the tongue itself, may fall forward, and leave the entrance into the windpipe free.
Page 16 - With other ministrations thou, O Nature ! Healest thy wandering and distempered child: Thou pourest on him thy soft influences, Thy sunny hues, fair forms, and breathing sweets; Thy melodies of woods, and winds, and waters ! Till he relent, and can no more endure To be a jarring and a dissonant thing Amid this general dance and minstrelsy; But, bursting into tears, wins back his way, His angry spirit healed and harmonized By the benignant touch of love and beauty.
Page 288 - Place the patient gently on the face, with one wrist under the forehead, (All fluids and the tongue itself then fall forwards, and leave the entrance into the windpipe free).
Page 156 - ... by the necessity for a supply of carbon and hydrogen, to support his respiration, this want may be most advantageously fulfilled by the employment of a certain quantity of non-azotized food, in which these ingredients predominate. Thus it has been calculated that, since fifteen pounds of flesh contain no more carbon than four pounds of starch, a savage with one animal and an equal weight of starch, could support life for the same length of time during which another restricted to animal COMPOSITION...
Page 288 - Promote the warmth of the body by the application of hot flannels, bottles, or bladders of hot water, heated bricks, &c., to the pit of the stomach, the arm-pits, between the thighs, and to the soles of the feet.
Page 13 - we have examples of the compatibility of even the heat of boiling water with the preservation of animal life. Thus in a hot spring at Manilla, which raises the thermometer to 187, and in another in Barbary, whose usual temperature is 172, fishes have been seen to flourish. Fishes have been thrown up in very hot water from the crater of a volcano, which from their lively condition, was apparently their natural residence.
Page 516 - Captain Hancock informs me that the Brazilian Cicadae sing so loud as to be heard at the distance of a mile. This is as if a man of ordinary stature, supposing his powers of voice increased in the ratio of his size, could be heard all over the world. So that Stentor himself becomes a mute when compared with these insects.
Page 3 - So directly, however, is infant life influenced by good or bad management, that, about a century ago, the workhouses of London presented the astounding result of twenty-three deaths in every twentyfour infants under the age of one year. For a long time this frightful devastation was allowed to go on, as beyond the reach of human remedy. But when at last an improved system of management was adopted in consequence of a parliamentary inquiry having taken place, the proportion of deaths was speedily...

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