A Life of Washington (Google eBook)

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G. Clark and Son, 1848 - 288 pages
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Page 254 - ... it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national union to your collective and individual happiness...
Page 255 - The basis of our political Systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their Constitutions of Government. But the Constitution which at any time exists, 'till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole People, is sacredly obligatory upon all.
Page 256 - The disorders and miseries which result, gradually incline the minds of men to seek security and repose in the absolute power of an individual ; and sooner or later, the chief of some prevailing faction, more able or more fortunate than his competitors, turns this disposition to the purposes of his own elevation, on the ruins of public liberty.
Page 230 - Happy in the confirmation of our Independence and Sovereignty, and pleased with the opportunity afforded the United States of becoming a respectable nation, I resign with satisfaction the appointment I accepted with diffidence; a diffidence in my abilities to accomplish so arduous a task, which, however, was superseded by a confidence in the rectitude of our cause, the support of the supreme Power of the Union, and the patronage of Heaven.
Page 253 - In looking forward to the moment which is intended to terminate the career of my public life, my feelings do not permit me to suspend the deep acknowledgment of that debt of gratitude which I owe to my beloved country for the many honors it has conferred upon me...
Page 232 - Having defended the standard of liberty in this new world ; having taught a lesson useful to those who inflict, and to those who feel oppression, you retire from the great theatre of action, with the blessings of your fellowcitizens ; but the glory of your virtues will not terminate with your military command, it will continue to animate remotest ages.
Page 256 - DESERT the oaths, which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice ; and let us with caution indulge the supposition, that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.
Page 254 - Here, perhaps, I ought to stop. But a solicitude for your welfare, which cannot end but with my life, and the apprehension of danger, natural to that solicitude, urge me, on an occasion like the present, to offer to your solemn contemplation...
Page 257 - Promote, then, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.
Page 231 - I consider it an indispensable duty to close this last act of my official life by commending the interests of our dearest country to the protection of Almighty God and those who have the superintendence of them to His holy keeping.

References from web pages

Poe, "Simplicity" and 'Blackwood's Magazine
(23) Edgar Allan Poe, "A Life of Washington. By James K. Paulding," Southern Literary Messenger, 2 (May 1836), 396, reprinted in Works, IX, 13-16. ...
www.questia.com/ PM.qst?a=o& se=gglsc& d=5001365440

USAMHI
Paulding, James K. A Life of Washington. 2 vols. NY: Harper, 1861. E312P325.1861. ... Ferling, John E. The First of Men: A Life of Washington. ...
ahecwebdds.carlisle.army.mil/ awapps/ pdfopener?smd=1& md=1& did=44308

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