Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, Volume 12 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Bombay Geographical Society, 1856 - Geography
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 50 - Doot-ko-hi-calik), as its description, and that of the low shore in the neighbourhood of Point Ogle and Montreal Island, agree exactly with that of Sir George Back.* Some of the bodies...
Page 50 - From the mutilated state of many of the corpses, and the contents of the kettles, it is evident that our wretched countrymen had been driven to the last resource cannibalism as a means of prolonging existence.
Page 11 - And the hail smote throughout all the land of Egypt all that was in the field, both man and beast; and the hail smote every herb of the field, and brake every tree of the field.
Page 50 - ... were now going to where they expected to find deer to shoot. From the appearance of the men, all of whom...
Page 50 - At a later date the same season, "but previous to the breaking up of the ice, the bodies of some thirty persons were discovered on the continent, and .five on an island near it, about a long day's journey to the NW of a large stream...
Page 50 - None of the party could speak the Esquimaux language intelligibly, but by signs the natives were made to understand that their ship, or ships, had been crushed by ice, and that they were now going to where they expected to find deer to shoot. From the appearance...
Page 50 - white men' (Kabloonans) had perished from want of food some distance to the westward, and not far beyond a large river containing many falls and rapids. Subsequently, further particulars were received and a number of articles purchased, which places the fate of a portion, if not of all, of the then survivors of Sir John Franklin's long-lost party beyond a doubt - a fate as terrible as the imagination can conceive. The substance of the information obtained at various times and from various sources...
Page 21 - N.. long. 14 12' E. Alt. 3500 feet. A severe hailstorm was experienced in the Poorundhur Talooka of this Collectorate on the afternoon of the llth of December. Numbers of persons were severely injured by the falling of large ice-flakes, many of them weighing several pounds, and cattle in considerable numbers have died from the effects of the storm, which, for the time it lasted (about three hours), was the most severe of any within the recollection of the oldest inhabitant. The hailstorm was succeeded,...
Page lxxiii - Maury, whose labours have been incessant. Not only does that Government offer directions and charts gratis to American ships, but also to those of our nation, in accordance with certain easy and just conditions. In this country, the Government, through the Board of Trade, will supply a certain number of ships which are going on distant voyages with ' abstract logs' (or meteorological registers) and instruments gratis, in order to assist effectively in carrying out this important national undertaking.
Page 10 - ... larger than hen's eggs in India. inches in diameter. At Dum Dum, the artillery cantonment in Bengal, on the 8th of April, 1838, two hailstones were picked up which measured sixteen inches in circumference and more than five inches in diameter. At Jaulna, on the 14th of January, 1849, the hailstones were as large as billiard-balls. ' On the 5th of February, 1850, at Gwalior, pieces of ice fell nearly two pounds weight, and animals and some men were killed. At Condwiel, near Sattarah, on the 7th...

Bibliographic information