How Rome Fell: Death of a Superpower (Google eBook)

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Yale University Press, May 1, 2009 - History
16 Reviews
In AD 200, the Roman Empire seemed unassailable. Its vast territory accounted for most of the known world. By the end of the fifth century, Roman rule had vanished in western Europe and much of northern Africa, and only a shrunken Eastern Empire remained. What accounts for this improbable decline? Here, Adrian Goldsworthy applies the scholarship, perspective, and narrative skill that defined his monumental Caesar to address perhaps the greatest of all historical questions?how Rome fell. It was a period of remarkable personalities, from the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius to emperors like Diocletian, who portrayed themselves as tough, even brutal, soldiers. It was a time of revolutionary ideas, especially in religion, as Christianity went from persecuted sect to the religion of state and emperors. Goldsworthy pays particular attention to the willingness of Roman soldiers to fight and kill each other. Ultimately, this is the story of how an empire without a serious rival rotted from within, its rulers and institutions putting short-term ambition and personal survival over the wider good of the state. How Rome Fell is a brilliant successor to Goldsworthy's "monumental" (The Atlantic) Caesar.
  

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Review: How Rome Fell: Death of a Superpower

User Review  - Arthur Kyriazis - Goodreads

As usual this account of the fall of the Roman Empire sales to take account of the fact that Rome could not fall in 476 AD But lasted until 1453 ad. Practically since the Sultan assumed the title of ... Read full review

Review: How Rome Fell: Death of a Superpower

User Review  - Jeff - Goodreads

I have been reading this book for the last few months with, admittedly, some large gaps in reading. Over the last couple of weeks however I resolved to make a real effort and it did prove more ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
1
IntroductionThe Big Question
11
PART ONECrisis? The Third Century
27
PART TWORecovery? The Fourth Century
155
PART THREEFall? The Fifth and Sixth Centuries
283
ConclusionA Simple Answer
405
EpilogueAn Even Simpler Moral
416
Chronology
425
Glossary
441
Bibliography
449
Notes
467
Index
511
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Adrian Goldsworthy was educated at St. John's College, Oxford, where he completed his doctorate in ancient history, specializing in the military history of the Greek and especially Roman periods. He is the author of "The Roman Army at War 100 BC-AD 200", "In the Name of Rome: The Men Who Won the Roman Empire", "The Punic Wars", and "Cannae" among others. He lectures frequently and has lead several archaeological digs.

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