Writings of Levi Woodbury, LL.D. Political, Judicial and Literary (Google eBook)

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1852
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Page 108 - Northern and Southern, Atlantic and Western whence designing men may endeavor to excite a belief that there is a real difference of local interests and views. One of the expedients of party to acquire influence within particular districts is to misrepresent the opinions and aims of other districts.
Page 265 - An elective despotism was not the government we fought for ; but one which should not only be founded on free principles, but in which the powers of government should be so divided and balanced among several bodies of magistracy, as that no one could transcend their legal limits without being effectually checked and restrained by the others.
Page 86 - September last, shall be disposed of for the common benefit of the United States, and be settled and formed into distinct republican States, which shall become members of the Federal Union, and have the same rights of sovereignty, freedom, and independence, as the other States...
Page 90 - That this Assembly doth explicitly and peremptorily declare that it views the powers of the Federal Government, as resulting from the compact, to which the states are parties...
Page 464 - Cambridge ; public schools and grammar schools in the towns ; to encourage private societies and public institutions ; rewards and immunities for the promotion of agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manufactures, and a natural history of the country...
Page 485 - No person can in any case be subjected to law martial, or to any penalties or pains, by virtue of that law, except those employed in the army or navy, and except the militia in actual service, but by authority of the Legislature.
Page 463 - ... it shall be the duty of legislatures and magistrates, in all future periods of this commonwealth, to cherish the interests of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries of them; especially the university at Cambridge, public schools and grammar schools in the towns...
Page 414 - If Lord Castlereagh says we may recognize, we do; if not, we do not. . . . Our institutions now make us free; but how long shall we continue so, if we mold our opinions on those of Europe? Let us break these commercial and political fetters; let us no longer watch the nod of any European politician; let us become real and true Americans, and place ourselves at the head of the American system.
Page 90 - That the general assembly doth also express its deep regret, that a spirit has in sundry instances been manifested by the federal government, to enlarge its powers by forced constructions of the constitutional charter which defines them...
Page 403 - ... peace or safety of the State. No person shall be required to attend or support any ministry or place of worship against his consent, nor shall any preference be given by law to any religious denomination or mode of worship.

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