The Gentleman's and London Magazine: Or Monthly Chronologer, 1741-1794 (Google eBook)

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J. Exshaw., 1741
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Page 228 - Turn, gentle hermit of the dale, And guide my lonely way To where yon taper cheers the vale With hospitable ray. " For here forlorn and lost I tread, With fainting steps and slow ; Where wilds immeasurably spread, Seem lengthening as I go.'" " Forbear, my son," the hermit cries, " To tempt the dangerous gloom ; For yonder faithless phantom flies To lure thee to thy doom.
Page 174 - Britain; and that the King's Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords spiritual and temporal and Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled, had, hath and of right ought to have, full power and authority to make laws and statutes of sufficient force and validity to bind the colonies and people of America, subjects of the Crown of Great Britain in all cases whatsoever.
Page 150 - It is my opinion that this kingdom has no right to lay a tax upon the colonies. At the same time I assert the authority of this kingdom over the colonies to be sovereign and supreme in every circumstance of government and legislation whatsoever.
Page 152 - When I proposed to tax America, I asked the House if any gentleman would object to the right; I repeatedly asked it, and no man would attempt to deny it. Protection and obedience are reciprocal. Great Britain protects America; America is bound to yield obedience.
Page 229 - But let a maid thy pity share, Whom love has taught to stray; Who seeks for rest, but finds despair Companion of her way.
Page 229 - The crackling faggot flies. But nothing could a charm impart To soothe the stranger's woe; For grief was heavy at his heart, And tears began to flow. His rising cares the Hermit spied, With answering care opprest : " And whence, unhappy youth," he cried, " The sorrows of thy breast ? " From better habitations spurn'd, Reluctant dost thou rove?
Page 229 - In humble simplest habit clad, No wealth nor power had he ; Wisdom and worth were all he had, But these were all to me. 'The blossom opening to the day, The dews of heaven refin'd, Could nought of purity display, To emulate his mind.
Page 229 - And water from the spring. Then, pilgrim, turn, thy cares forego, All earth-born cares are wrong ; Man wants but little here below, Nor wants that little long.
Page 199 - And how unbecoming must it appear in a member of the legislature to vote for a new law, who is utterly ignorant of the old...
Page 229 - Alas ! the joys that fortune brings Are trifling, and decay; And those who prize the paltry things, More trifling still than they. " And what is friendship but a name, A charm that lulls to sleep : A shade that follows wealth or fame...

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