Tales of Our Great Families, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Hurst and Blackett, 1877 - Great Britain Biography
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Page 73 - Here he lives in state and bounty, Lord of Burleigh, fair and free, Not a lord in all the county Is so great a lord as he.
Page 78 - Though at times her spirit sank ; Shaped her heart with woman's meekness To all duties of her rank : And a gentle consort made he, And her gentle mind was such That she grew a noble lady, And the people loved her much.
Page 78 - Oh, that he Were once more that landscape-painter Which did win my heart from me !" So she droop'd and droop'd before him, Fading slowly from his side : Three fair children first she bore him, Then before her time she died. Weeping, weeping late and early, Walking up and pacing down, Deeply mourn'd the Lord of Burleigh, Burleigh-house by Stamford-town.
Page 28 - Duke Hamilton is the abstract of Scotch pride ; he and the Duchess at their own house walk in to dinner before their company, sit together at the upper end of their own table, eat off the same plate, and drink to nobody beneath the rank of Earl would not one wonder how they could get anybody either above or below that rank to dine with them at all ! I don't know whether you will not think all these very trifling histories ; but for myself, I love anything that marks a character strongly.
Page 63 - I waited now in her presence-chamber, with ease at my food and rest in my bed. I am pushed from the shore of comfort, and know not where the winds and waves of a Court will bear me; I know it bringeth little comfort on earth ; and he is, I reckon, no wise man that looketh this way to heaven.
Page 78 - ... at times her spirit sank : Shaped her heart with woman's meekness To all duties of her rank : And a gentle consort made he, And her gentle mind was such That she grew a noble lady, And the people loved her much. But a trouble weigh'd upon her, And perplex'd her, night and morn, With the burthen of an honour Unto which she was not born.
Page 27 - Friday, that even the noble crowd in the drawing-room clambered on chairs and tables to look at her. There are mobs at their doors to see them get into their chairs, and people go early to get places at the theatres, when it is known they will be there.
Page 27 - Hamilton made violent love at one end of the room, while he was playing at pharaoh at the other end; that is, he saw neither the bank nor his own cards, which were of three hundred pounds each : he soon lost a thousand. I own I was so little a professor in love, that I thought all this parade looked ill for the poor girl ; and could not conceive, if he was so much engaged with his mistress as to disregard such sums, why he played at all.
Page 27 - However, two nights afterwards, being left alone with her while her mother and sister were at Bedford House, he found himself so impatient, that he sent for a parson. The doctor refused to perform the ceremony without...
Page 63 - Tis a great task to prove one's honesty and yet not spoil one's fortune. You have tasted a little hereof in our blessed queen's time, who was more than a man, and, in troth, sometimes less than a woman.

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