What It Means to Be 98% Chimpanzee: Apes, People, and Their Genes (Google eBook)

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University of California Press, 2003 - Science - 333 pages
7 Reviews
Marks presents the field of molecular anthropology—a synthesis of the holistic approach of anthropology with the reductive approach of molecular genetics—as a way of improving our understanding of the science of human evolution. This iconoclastic, witty, and extremely readable book illuminates the deep background of our place in nature and asks us to think critically about what science is, and what passes for it, in modern society.
  

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Review: What It Means to Be 98% Chimpanzee: Apes, People, and Their Genes

User Review  - Scott Frank - Goodreads

The spiritual successor to Stephen Jay Gould's "Mismeasure of Man." Marks, with eloquent humor, tries to teach people why so much of what they think they know isn't quite true. What particularly great ... Read full review

Review: What It Means to Be 98% Chimpanzee: Apes, People, and Their Genes

User Review  - Thomas Stevenson - Goodreads

In the world of politics, science is whatever you want it to be. Marks says it isn't and set out to show the many ways that science has been misused to lead the unaware or uncritical to incorrect ... Read full review

Contents

THE APE IN YOU
32
HOW PEOPLE DIFFER FROM ONE ANOTHER
51
THE MEANING OF HUMAN VARIATION
72
BEHAVIORAL GENETICS
100
FOLK HEREDITY
128
HUMAN NATURE
159
HUMAN RIGHTS FOR APES?
180
A HUMAN GENE MUSEUM?
198
IDENTITY AND DESCENT
219
IS BLOOD REALLY SO DAMN THICK?
242
SCIENCE RELIGION AND WORLDVIEW
266
NOTES AND SOURCES
289
INDEX
303
Copyright

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Page 19 - His bodie is full of haire, but not very thicke ; and it is of a dunnish colour. " He differeth not from a man but in his legs ; for they have no calfe.
Page 19 - The People of the Countrie, when they travaile in the Woods, make fires where they sleepe in the night; and in the morning, when they are gone, the Pongoes will come and sit about the fire, til it goeth out: for they have no understanding to lay the wood together.
Page 19 - ... roaring away from them. Those Pongoes are never taken alive because they are so strong, that ten men cannot hold one of them ; but *yet they take many of their young ones with poisoned arrowes.
Page 19 - Pongo hangeth on his mother's belly with his hands fast clasped about her, so that when the countrie people kill any of the females they take the young one, which hangeth fast upon his mother. " When they die among themselves, they cover the dead with great heaps of boughs and wood, which is commonly found in the forest.

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About the author (2003)

Jonathan Marks teaches at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. He is the author of Human Biodiversity: Genes, Race, and History (1995) and coauthor, with Edward Staski, of Evolutionary Anthropology (1992).

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