The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure

Front Cover
William Goldman
Harcourt, 2007 - Fiction - 456 pages
79 Reviews
Here William Goldman's beloved story of Buttercup, Westley, and their fellow adventurers finally receives a beautiful illustrated treatment.

A tale of true love and high adventure, pirates, princesses, giants, miracles, fencing, and a frightening assortment of wild beasts--The Princess Bride is a modern storytelling classic.

As Florin and Guilder teeter on the verge of war, the reluctant Princess Buttercup is devastated by the loss of her true love, kidnapped by a mercenary and his henchman, rescued by a pirate, forced to marry Prince Humperdinck, and rescued once again by the very crew who absconded with her in the first place. In the course of this dazzling adventure, she'll meet Vizzini--the criminal philosopher who'll do anything for a bag of gold; Fezzik--the gentle giant; Inigo--the Spaniard whose steel thirsts for revenge; and Count Rugen--the evil mastermind behind it all. Foiling all their plans and jumping into their stories is Westley, Princess Buttercup's one true love and a very good friend of a very dangerous pirate.

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Review: The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure

User Review  - Robbo - Goodreads

The Princess Bride itself I mostly enjoyed, however the overall book was ruined by the ridiculous "Buttercups Baby", which I discovered was added later in the 25th anniversary edition. My advice is to skip this entirely and just read the original story. Read full review

Review: The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure

User Review  - Renee - Goodreads

Oh gosh. I really thought I'd love this book. I've loved the movie most of my life. The writing is good and it is funny and everything, but it just kind of fell flat for me and became a bit of a chore to read some parts. It's worth reading, certainly, but I think the movie is better. Read full review

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About the author (2007)

William Goldman, August 12, 1931 - William Goldman was born August 12, 1931 in Highland Park, Illinois. He attended Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio and then went on to Columbia University in New York. He began his writing career in 1957 and wrote his first screenplay, "Masquerade" in 1965. During an interim job teaching creative writing at Princeton University, Goldman wrote the screenplay for "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid." In 1973, he wrote "The Princess Bride," the only novel he ever wrote that he actually liked, and later adapted it for the screen. Goldman adapted three screenplays form his own novels, the other two titled "Marathon Man" in 1976 and "Heat" in 1978. He is the author of three novels about show biz, which tell the true story of making a living in Hollywood. They are "Adventures in the Screen Trade," "Hype and Glory" and the latest, "Which Lie Did I Tell," printed in 2000. Goldman has written over 20 novels as well as more than 20 major motion picture screenplays over the course of 45 plus years in the business. He has won three Lifetime Achievement Awards for Screenwriting, including the 1985 Laurel Award for Lifetime Achievement in Screenwriter. He has also won tow Screenwriter of the Year Awards and two Academy Awards, one for "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" and the other for "All the President's Men." He even managed to win an English Academy Award. Goldman has written under many pseudonyms during his career, but the two he is best known for are S. Morgenstern, for "The Princess Bride" and Harry Langlaugh, the name of Cassidy in "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.

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