Paradise Regained (Google eBook)

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Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Poetry
29 Reviews
Following the fall of Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden in Milton's "Paradise Lost", Milton turns his attention to the temptation of Jesus in the wilderness by Satan in "Paradise Regained". In this work, a sequel to "Paradise Lost", Satan tests Jesus in a similar way to Eve in the Garden of Eden. However, Jesus is not seduced by the promises of Satan and passes his test. "Paradise Regained" is a poetic and intriguing tale that follows along in the spirit of Milton's masterpiece "Paradise Lost".
  

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Review: Paradise Regained (Paradise #2)

User Review  - Maan Kawas - Goodreads

A beautiful poem, which is a sequel to Milton's epic poem “Paradise Lost”, with focus on with the temptation of Christ as mentioned in the Gospel of Luke. Although it is a beautiful work, it is not as ... Read full review

Review: Paradise Regained (Paradise #2)

User Review  - Eetu Kirsi - Goodreads

This "companion" poem to Milton's magnum opus was way better than what I expected based on the reviews. Dialogue between the Temptor and Son was so intense that what the poem lacked in grandure it ... Read full review

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Contents

BOOK I
3
BOOK II
20
BOOK III
36
BOOK IV
51
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

John Milton, English scholar and classical poet, is one of the major figures of Western literature. He was born in 1608 into a prosperous London family. By the age of 17, he was proficient in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew. Milton attended Cambridge University, earning a B.A. and an M.A. before secluding himself for five years to read, write and study on his own. It is believed that Milton read evertything that had been published in Latin, Greek, and English. He was considered one of the most educated men of his time. Milton also had a reputation as a radical. After his own wife left him early in their marriage, Milton published an unpopular treatise supporting divorce in the case of incompatibility. Milton was also a vocal supporter of Oliver Cromwell and worked for him. Milton's first work, Lycidas, an elegy on the death of a classmate, was published in 1632, and he had numerous works published in the ensuing years, including Pastoral and Areopagitica. His Christian epic poem, Paradise Lost, which traced humanity's fall from divine grace, appeared in 1667, assuring his place as one of the finest non-dramatic poet of the Renaissance Age. Milton went blind at the age of 43 from the incredible strain he placed on his eyes. Amazingly, Paradise Lost and his other major works, Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes, were composed after the lost of his sight. These major works were painstakingly and slowly dictated to secretaries. John Milton died in 1674.

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