The Other America: Poverty in the United States (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Aug 1, 1997 - Social Science - 252 pages
23 Reviews
When Michael Harrington’s masterpiece, The Other America, was first published in 1962, it was hailed as an explosive work and became a galvanizing force for the war on poverty. Harrington shed light on the lives of the poor—from farm to city—and the social forces that relegated them to their difficult situations. He was determined to make poverty in the United States visible and his observations and analyses have had a profound effect on our country, radically changing how we view the poor and the policies we employ to help them.

In the fifty years since it was published, The Other America has been established as a seminal work of sociology. This anniversary edition includes Michael Harrington’s essays on poverty in the 1970s and ’80s as well as a new introduction by Harrington’s biographer, Maurice Isserman. This illuminating, profoundly moving classic is still all too relevant for today’s America.
  

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Review: The Other America: Poverty in the United States

User Review  - Michael - Goodreads

Harrington portrays the plight of marginalized poor in the 1960's. I've heard that this revolutionary book has spurred the enactment of War on Poverty, and I can easily understand why. The aged ... Read full review

Review: The Other America: Poverty in the United States

User Review  - Anna Nowinski - Goodreads

Sad - but important. Have things really changed from the middle of last century? Read full review

Contents

The Invisible Land
1
Pastures of Plenty
39
If Youre Black Stay Back
61
Three Poverties
82
The Golden Years
101
The Twisted Spirit
121
Old Slums New Slums
139
Poverty in the Seventies
195
Poverty and the Eighties
215
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Michael Harrington is a political economist, public policy analyst, and author. He holds advanced degrees in political science, finance, and economics. He currently writes on economic policy and politics on the blog, Casino Capitalism and Crapshoot Politics. Harrington has harbored a life-long fascination with the art, culture, and politics of the Italian Renaissance, and has lived and studied in Italy, near Florence. His enduring interest in the social movements and artistic creativity of this period led him to study the life stories of Girolamo Savonarola, Niccolo Machiavelli, Michelangelo, and Leonardo da Vinci. As a visiting scholar to the Bridwell Library at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, he conducted research with primary Renaissance materials for his dramatized history-fiction trilogy on Savonarola and Machiavelli, titled The City of Man: Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso. He recently published two more works. Saving Mona Lisa is a novel about the world's most famous painting told through the eyes of Leonardo da Vinci's young assistant and eventual archivist, Francesco Melzi. The story is inspired by two real mysteries: Why did Leonardo insist the painting was never finished, refusing to surrender it to its rightful owner? And, who painted the copies, several of which depict Mona Lisa bare-breasted? The story delves into the conflicts inherent to artistic creativity and love by examining one of the most creative and complex personalities in history. Political Economy Simplified: A Citizen's Survival Guide is a condensed public policy primer that integrates analyses of economics, financial markets, and American politics into a broad overview of national policy for citizen-voters. This primer derives from and supplements the author's weblog, Casino Capitalism and Crapshoot Politics. His latest book, published November 1, 2013, is a political novel that modernizes the Renaissance conflict between religion and politics to the current era of religious fundamentalism and secular politics. This work, titled In God We Trust, develops a Machiavellian plot that dramatizes Washington politics during the period from the Millennial through 9/11 and the build-up to the Iraq War.

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