The Maine Woods (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Sep 1, 1988 - Nature - 480 pages
40 Reviews
"What a wilderness walk for a man to take alone!...Here was traveling of the old heroic kind over the unaltered face of nature." Henry David Thoreau

Over a period of three years, Thoreau made three trips to the largely unexplored woods of Maine. He climbed mountains, paddled a canoe by moonlight, and dined on cedar beer, hemlock tea and moose lips. Taking notes constantly, Thoreau was just as likely to turn his observant eye to the habits and languages of the Abnaki Indians or the arduous life of the logger as he was to the workings of nature. He acutely observed the rivers, lakes, mountains, wolves, moose, and stars in the dark sky. He also told of nights sitting by the campfire, and of meeting men who communicated with each other by writing on the trunks of trees. In The Maine Woods, Thoreau captured a wilder side of America and revealed his own adventurous spirit.

  

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Review: The Maine Woods (Writings of Henry D. Thoreau)

User Review  - David Kessler - Goodreads

I enjoyed it more than Walden Pond. The views in the dense woods of Maine just made you feel closed in. Maine woods are so dense and inpenitrible. Good tales Read full review

Review: The Maine Woods (Writings of Henry D. Thoreau)

User Review  - Goodreads

I enjoyed it more than Walden Pond. The views in the dense woods of Maine just made you feel closed in. Maine woods are so dense and inpenitrible. Good tales Read full review

Contents

I TREES
II FLOWERS AND SHRUBS
III LIST OF PLANTS
IV LIST OF BIRDS
V QUADRUPEDS
VII A LIST OF INDIAN WORDS
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 May 6, 1862) was an American author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, historian, and leading transcendentalist. He is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance to civil government in moral opposition to an unjust state.

Edward Hoagland has written more than twenty books, including the travel memoirsAlaskan Travels and African Calliope, the essay collections Walking the Dead Diamond River and The Tugman s Passage, and the novels Cat Man and Seven Rivers West. He worked in the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus while attending Harvard, and later traveled the world writing for a number of national magazines including Harper s and Esquire.He has received numerous prestigious literary awards, and taught at many American colleges and universities. He is a native New Yorker, who now divides his time between Martha s Vineyard and Burton, Vermont.

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