Select Eulogies of the Members of the French Academy: With Notes, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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A. Strahan, 1799
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Page 32 - Here," faid he, with tears in his eyes, ** is the alley where this worthy prelate ** took his walks with us : here is the ar" hour under which he ufed to repofe ** while he read : this is the garden which " he cultivated with his own hands.
Page 11 - The reafon was, that Maffillon knew how to defcend on their account to the only language they would hear, that of a...
Page 21 - ... and beneficence due from the great and powerful of the earth to the little and feeble, whom Nature has created their fellows, Humanity has made their brethren, and Fortune has doomed to wretchednefs.
Page 12 - Christian orator to approach them without effort and unresisted, and to obtain a conquest even without a combat. His action was perfectly suited to his species of eloquence. On entering the pulpit, he appeared thoroughly penetrated with the great truths he was about to utter ; with eyes declined, a modest and collected air, without violent motions, and almost without gestures, but animating the whole with a voice of sensibility, he diffused over his audience the religious emotion which his own exterior...
Page 21 - Being himfelf, placed between oppreflbr kings and opprefled people, to intimidate the one and avenge the other: fuch is the object of the Petit Careme, worthy of being learned by all children deftined to the throne, and meditated by all men entrufted with governing the world.
Page 15 - Chriftian morality in the manfions of vice with an aufterity capable of rendering it odious, and of expofing religion to the refentment of haughty and offended power. Our orator was always firm, but always refpectful, while he announced to his fovereign the will of the Judge of kings.
Page 13 - Baron to attend on one of his discourses : on leaving the church, he said to a friend who accompanied him, " This man is an orator, and we are only players." The court soon wished to hear him, or rather to judge him. Without pride, as without fear, he appeared on this great and formidable theatre. He opened with distinguished lustre ; and the exordium of his first discourse is one of the master strokes of modern eloquence. Louis XIV. was then at the summit of power and glory, admired by all Europe,...
Page 12 - ... species of eloquence. On entering the pulpit, he appeared thoroughly penetrated with the great truths he was about to utter ; with eyes declined, a modest and collected air, without violent motions, and almost without gestures, but animating the whole with a voice of sensibility, he diffused over his audience the religious emotion which his own exterior proclaimed, and caused himself to be listened to with that profound silence by which eloquence is better praised than by the loudest applauses.
Page 13 - Bleflfed are they that mourn ;" and from this he. had the art to draw an eulogy the more novel and flattering, as it feemed dictated by the gofpel itfelf, and fuch as a apoftle might have made.
Page 29 - ... it was not till after his death that they became acquainted with the benefa&or to whom they were fo greatly indebted.

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