Our Posthuman Future: Consequences of the Biotechnology Revolution

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Macmillan, 2002 - Science - 272 pages
30 Reviews
A decade after his now-famous pronouncement of “the end of history,” Francis Fukuyama argues that as a result of biomedical advances, we are facing the possibility of a future in which our humanity itself will be altered beyond recognition. Fukuyama sketches a brief history of man’s changing understanding of human nature: from Plato and Aristotle to the modernity’s utopians and dictators who sought to remake mankind for ideological ends. Fukuyama argues that the ability to manipulate the DNA of all of one person’s descendants will have profound, and potentially terrible, consequences for our political order, even if undertaken with the best of intentions. In Our Posthuman Future, one of our greatest social philosophers begins to describe the potential effects of genetic exploration on the foundation of liberal democracy: the belief that human beings are equal by nature.
  

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Review: Our Posthuman Future: Consequences of the Biotechnology Revolution

User Review  - Daniel Toker - Goodreads

If nothing else, the breadth of knowledge that Fukuyama brings to bear on the ethics of biotechnology is remarkable: he is as comfortable talking about ethology as he is Kantian ethics or ... Read full review

Review: Our Posthuman Future: Consequences of the Biotechnology Revolution

User Review  - Antonio Nunez - Goodreads

...When Fukuyama, in his latest book, published a few months ago, takes to task large segments of the scientifical and bioethical community, we should pay attention, for he is rarely misinformed and ... Read full review

Contents

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About the author (2002)

Francis Fukuyama teaches at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of Trust, The End of History, and The Last Man, among other works. He lives in McLean, Virginia.

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