Alaska

Front Cover
Random House, 1988 - Fiction - 868 pages
19 Reviews
The high points in the story of Alaska since the American acquisition are brought vividly to life through more than 100 characters, real and fictional. Another told-from-the-beginning-of-time Michener saga, this one featuring Alaska. The book begins a billion years ago. Its first characters are the mastadon and the woolly mammoth, followed by such other settlers as the Eskimos, Athapaskans, and Russians. Vignettes of characters as varied as the Danish navigator Vitus Bering, who explored Alaska for Russia's Peter the Great, and Kendra Scott, the young Colorado teacher who taught the Eskimo children during the recent Prudhoe Bay oil boom, illustrate the colorful history of this vast and exploited land. Early on the book is vintage Michener, but the momentum encounters an Arctic chill midway. Final sections are trite, uneven, and overloaded with stereotypes. Too cumbersome to be called fiction, but Michener fans will demand it anyway.

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Review: Alaska

User Review  - Sarah Phillips - Goodreads

A fictional tale of the history of Alaska, as told through the stories of several families, from Indians to Russians to Americans. Upon reading one of Michener's tomes, one can really understand quite ... Read full review

Review: Alaska

User Review  - Julie - Goodreads

What a creative and engaging way to tell the history of Alaska! I enjoyed every disparate story along the journey, knowing that each would tie back into the long line of characters that had already ... Read full review

Contents

THE CLASHING TERRANES
3
THE ICE CASTLE II
13
PEOPLE OF THE NORTH
34
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (1988)

Universally revered novelist James A. Michener was forty before he decided on writing as a career. Prior to that, he had been an outstanding academic, an editor, and a U.S. Navy lieutenant commander in the Pacific Theater during World War II. His first book, Tales of the South Pacific, won a Pulitzer Prize and became the basis of the award-winning Rodgers and Hammerstein musical South Pacific. In the course of the next forty years Mr. Michener wrote such monumental bestsellers as Sayonara, The Bridges at Toko-Ri, Hawaii, The Source, Chesapeake, Centennial, Texas, Alaska, Caribbean, and Mexico.
Decorated with America's highest civilian award, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, Mr. Michener served on the Advisory Council to NASA, held honorary doctorates in five fields from thirty leading universities, and received an award from the President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities for his continuing commitment to art in America. James A. Michener died on October 16, 1997.

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