Mac OS X in a Nutshell

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"O'Reilly Media, Inc.", 2003 - Computers - 801 pages
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Mac OS X is a stunning technical achievement--a virtually crash-proof Unix core paired with the sleek Aqua interface, bringing style, usability, and stability to a new level. It has almost everything that Macintosh fans have been waiting for: protected memory, crash resistance, and the ability to run the 18,000 existing Mac programs and an unlimited supply of Unix and Open Source software. An instant success among longtime Apple users and developers, the new Mac operating system is becoming the system of choice among serious Unix users as well. There is plenty of territory to explore in Mac OS X, and O'Reilly's latest Nutshell book,Mac OS X in a Nutshell, offers all audiences--both longtime Mac users and converts--the most complete guide to this remarkable operating system.

In the tradition of O'Reilly's Nutshell series, this new title offers a thorough treatment of Mac OS X version 10.2, from its BSD Unix foundation to Aqua, the new user interface. The book's "Unix Command Reference" is the most complete and thorough coverage of Mac OS X Unix commands you can find anywhere. Each command and option in this section has been painstakingly tested and checked against Jaguar--even the manpages that ship with the system can't compete in accuracy. The reference incorporates the new command-line tools that come with Apple's Developer tools. It familiarizes readers with the Finder and the Dock, file management, system configuration, network administration issues, and more. Later chapters include bonus material for the Unix user, including advanced use of the Terminal and how to configure a DAMP (Darwin, Apache, MySQL, Perl/PHP) web publishing system. Other topics covered in the book include:

  • Filesystem overview
  • Running Java applications
  • System and Network Administration
  • Directory Services and NetInfo
  • Scripting on Mac OS X
  • Using CVS
  • Unix Command Reference
  • Installing and Running X Windows and BSD Unix applications
Mac OS X in a Nutshellfollows the common-sense O'Reilly approach, cutting through the hype and giving readers practical details they can use every day. Serious users who want more from their system will find everything they need to know systematically documented in this book. It provides a wealth of knowledge for anyone who wants to make the most of Mac OS X.
  

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Contents

Using Mac OS X
3
The Dock
18
Windows
28
Opening and Saving Documents
36
Services
39
Logging Out and Shutting Down
40
Starting Up and Logging In
41
Using the Finder
44
NetInfo User Interfaces
307
Exploring Common Directories
313
The Machines Directory
314
For More Information
315
Running Network Services
316
Mail Services
318
Web Services
320
File Transfer Protocol FTP
321

Finder Views
47
Menus and Keyboard Shortcuts
57
Files Folders and Disks
62
Moving Copying and Renaming Objects
70
The Get Info Window
73
Favorites
75
Searching for and Locating Files
76
Relaunching the Finder
81
Mac OS 9 Mac OS X and Classic
82
What Is Classic?
86
Starting Classic
87
Controlling Classic
88
Managing Classic Applications
90
Using Classic Applications
92
Printing from Classic
96
DualBooting with Mac OS 9
97
Task and Setting Index
99
System Configuration
127
System Preferences
129
The System Preference Panels
132
Speech Recognition and Speakable Commands
181
Adding Panes to System Preferences
186
Applications and Utilities
188
Applications
189
Installing Applications
201
Networking
209
Mounting Network Disks
219
Web Browsing
223
Using FTP
226
Remote Logins
227
Virtual Network Computers
228
Printer Configuration and Printing
230
The Print Dialog
231
Print Center
234
Page Setup
238
Alternative Printer Interfaces
239
Printer Sharing
242
Printer Drivers
244
Filesystem Overview
246
Filesystem Organization
248
Hidden Files
255
The File Permissions System
260
Running Java Applications
264
Running Standalone Applications
265
Java on the Command Line
269
Building Applications with MRJAppBuilder
270
System and Network Administration
275
System Administration Overview
277
Managing Users and Groups
279
Network Administration
283
NFS
287
SingleUser Mode
296
Cron Tasks
298
Directory Services and NetInfo
300
Directory Access
301
NetInfo Concepts
303
Remote Login Services
322
File Sharing Services
323
Web Publishing with a DAMP System
327
Setting Up DAMP
328
Using Web Serving Frameworks
333
Scripting and Development
335
Development Tools
337
The Developer Folder
338
Development Applications
339
Project Builder
341
Programming Languages
349
Interface Builder
351
Libraries and Frameworks
353
The Infoplist File
354
AppleScript
355
Programming AppleScript
356
Scripting the Terminal
365
Text Editing on Mac OS X
366
Property Lists
368
Unix Text Editors
370
Text Encodings
401
Using CVS
402
Basic Concepts
403
CVS Administrator Reference
406
CVS User Reference
422
CVS in Project Builder
445
Under Mac OS Xs Hood
449
Using the Terminal
451
Process Management
457
Terminal Alternatives
461
Pattern Matching
463
Metacharacters
465
Examples of Searching
466
Shells and Shell Programming
469
Mac OS X Shells
470
tcsh in Detail
473
Variables
476
Expressions
486
Command History
489
CommandLine Manipulation
492
Job Control
496
Builtin tcsh Commands
497
The Defaults System
515
Viewing and Editing Property Lists
519
Running the X Windows System
526
Running XDarwin
527
X11Based Applications and Libraries
528
AquaX11 Interactions
530
Connecting to Other X Window Systems
531
Installing Unix Software
533
Installing from Source
536
Unix Command Reference
538
Alphabetical Summary of Commands
539
Resources
763
Index
769
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Jason McIntosh lives and works in and around Boston. He has co-authored two O'Reilly books, Mac OS X in a Nutshell and Perl & XML, and writes occasional columns and weblog entries for the O'Reilly Network. His homepage is at http://www.jmac.org.

Chuck Toporek cut his teeth on a Mac II system when he got his first job in publishing in 1988, and has been using them ever since. Chuck is a senior editor in charge of the Mac OS X/Apple Developer Connection (ADC) series for O'Reilly & Associates, Inc. He is also the author/editor of the Mac OS X Panther Pocket Guide, co-author of Mac OS X in a Nutshell, and author of the upcoming title, Inside .Mac.

Chris Stone (cjstone@mac.com) is a Senior Systems Administrator (the Mac guy) at O'Reilly & Associates and coauthor of Mac OS X in a Nutshell. He's written several Mac OS X related articles for the O'Reilly MacDevCenter (www.macdevcenter.com), and contributed to Mac OS X: The Missing Manual from Pogue Press. Chris lives in Petaluma, California with his wife, Miho, and two sons, Andrew and Jonathan.

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