Chicago and Its Suburbs (Google eBook)

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T. A. Hungerford & Company, 1874 - Chicago (Ill.) - 468 pages
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Amazingly accurate book, but the bottom lines of each page are missing.

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Page 77 - The tunnel will deliver under a head of two feet, 19,000,000 gallons of water daily; under a head of eight feet, 38,000,000 gallons daily, and under a head of eighteen feet, 57,000,000 gallons daily. The velocities for the above quantities will be . one and four-tenths miles per hour, head being two feet ; head being eight feet, the velocity will be two and three-tenths miles per hour; and the head being eighteen feet the velocity will be four and two-tenths miles per hour. By these means it will...
Page 77 - ... being thoroughly emptied in case of repairs, the water being shut off at the crib by means of a gate. The work has been laid in brick eight inches thick all round, well set in cement. The lower half of the bore is constructed in such a manner that the bricks lie against the clay, while in the upper half the bricks are wedged in between the brick and the clay, thus preventing any danger which might result from the tremendous pressure which it was feared might burst in the tunnel.
Page 77 - ... the shore of two feet per mile, falling four feet in the whole distance, to admit of it being thoroughly emptied in case of repairs, the water being shut off at the crib by means of a gate. The work has been laid in brick eight inches thick all round, well set in cement. The lower half of the bore is constructed in such a manner that the bricks lie against the clay, while in the upper half the bricks are wedged in between the brick and the clay, thus preventing any danger which might result...
Page 89 - Its prestige has passed away, like that of a man who turns the downward hill of life ; its glory will be of the past, not the present ; while its hopes, once so bright and cloudless, will be to the end marred and blackened by the smoke of its fiery fate.
Page 202 - ... canal time," one-quarter down and the balance in one, two, and three years. The purchasers had depended on a continual advance in values to meet those payments and found that they could not even sell at a ruinous sacrifice. Great numbers of workers left the city for want of employment, and those who remained were obliged to go into narrowed quarters to reduce expenses. This caused a great many residences and stores to be vacated and brought about a reduction in rents on those still occupied,...
Page 148 - It could only start by the independent acts of indivtduals, and rise, if at all, by intrinsic merit." The University charter, as before intimated, gives to the Baptist denomination the leading representation, but yet leaves its privileges and honors open to all ; its Boards of Trustees and Regents, and its Professorships, being open to representatives from any religious denomination. In the words of the charter...
Page 148 - It then stated that otherwise than this, "no religious test or particular religious profession shall ever be held as a requisite for admission to any department of the University, or for election to any professorship, or other place of honor or emolument in it, but the same shall be open alike to persons of any religious faith or profession.
Page 148 - No other religious test or particular religious profession shall ever be held as a requisite for election to said board, or for admission to said University, or to any department belonging thereto, or which shall be under the supervision. or control of this corporation, or for election to any professorship, or any place of honor or emolument in said corporation, or...
Page 76 - ... be built over all, serving the double purpose of guarding the crib from injury by vessels, and of showing the way to the harbor of Chicago.
Page 76 - It is forty feet and a half high, and built in pentagonal form, in a circumscribing circle of ninety-eight and a half feet in diameter. It is built of logs one foot square, and consists of three walls, at a distance of eleven feet from each other, leaving a central pentagonal space having an inscribed circle of...

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