The Return of The Native (Google eBook)

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Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
15 Reviews
The native of Thomas Hardy's 1878 novel "The Return of the Native" is Clym (Clement) Yeobright, a young man who gives a successful career as a diamond merchant in Paris to return to his native Egdon Heath to become a Schoolmaster and to help educate poor and ignorant children. Clym's character is contrasted by Eustacia Vye, a beautiful young woman who longs to escape Egdon Heath for a more glamorous life elsewhere. Hearing of Clym's return she pursues him with hopes of him taking her away to that more glamorous life which she seeks. A captivating novel of the Victorian era, Hardy's "The Return of the Native" dramatically underscores the idea that regardless of our desires, in the end we are truly helpless to escape our destiny.
  

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Review: The Return of the Native

User Review  - Heather - Goodreads

This book really deserves 3.5 stars, because there is a lot of clever writing, lots of phrases that I underlined and read outloud to my husband. Thomas Hardy, he knows how to turn a phrase. It's not 4 ... Read full review

Review: The Return of the Native

User Review  - David Sarkies - Goodreads

A young man returns to his home 27 Aug 2014 This was the last book on the English I curriculum and while I am undecided as to whether I actually read it (namely because when you get to that end of the ... Read full review

Contents

I
7
II
9
III
12
IV
25
V
28
VI
35
VII
43
VIII
47
XXVI
129
XXVII
137
XXVIII
142
XXIX
145
XXX
151
XXXI
158
XXXII
162
XXXIII
165

IX
50
X
56
XI
61
XII
66
XIII
68
XIV
71
XV
73
XVI
79
XVII
84
XVIII
90
XIX
95
XX
101
XXI
104
XXII
109
XXIII
117
XXIV
121
XXV
125
XXXIV
171
XXXV
175
XXXVI
179
XXXVII
184
XXXVIII
189
XXXIX
194
XL
197
XLI
201
XLII
204
XLIII
209
XLIV
215
XLV
221
XLVI
226
XLVII
228
XLVIII
231
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About the author (2004)

Thomas Hardy was born on June 2, 1840, in Higher Bockhampton, England. The eldest child of Thomas and Jemima, Hardy studied Latin, French, and architecture in school. He also became an avid reader. Upon graduation, Hardy traveled to London to work as an architect's assistant under the guidance of Arthur Bloomfield. He also began writing poetry. How I Built Myself a House, Hardy's first professional article, was published in 1865. Two years later, while still working in the architecture field, Hardy wrote the unpublished novel The Poor Man and the Lady. During the next five years, Hardy wrote Desperate Remedies, Under the Greenwood Tree, and a Pair of Blue Eyes. In 1873, Hardy decided it was time to relinquish his architecture career and concentrate on writing full-time. In September 1974, his first book as a full-time author, Far From the Madding Crowd, appeared serially. After publishing more than two dozen novels, one of the last being Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Hardy returned to writing poetry--his first love. Some of Hardy's volumes of poetry include Poems of the Past and Present, The Dynasts: Part One, Two, and Three, Time's Laughingstocks, and The Famous Tragedy of the Queen of Cornwall. From 1833 until his death, Hardy lived in a house in Dorchester, England. The house, Max Gate, was designed by Hardy, who also supervised its' construction. Thomas Hardy died on January 11, 1928. His ashes were buried in Poet's Corner at Westminster Abbey.

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