Three Junes

Front Cover
Random House LLC, 2002 - Fiction - 353 pages
26 Reviews
Three Junes is a vividly textured symphonic novel set on both sides of the Atlantic during three fateful summers in the lives of a Scottish family. In June of 1989, Paul McLeod, the recently widowed patriarch, becomes infatuated with a young American artist while traveling through Greece and is compelled to relive the secret
sorrows of his marriage. Six years later, Paul’s death reunites his sons at Tealing, their idyllic childhood home, where Fenno, the eldest, faces a choice that puts him at the center of his family’s future. A lovable, slightly repressed gay man, Fenno leads the life of an aloof expatriate in the West Village, running a shop filled with books and birdwatching gear. He believes himself safe from all emotional entanglements—until a worldly neighbor presents him with an extraordinary gift and a seductive photographer makes him an unwitting subject. Each man draws Fenno into territories of the heart he has never braved before, leading him toward an almost unbearable loss that will reveal to him the nature of love.

Love in its limitless forms—between husband and wife, between lovers, between people and animals, between parents and children—is the force that moves these characters’ lives, which collide again, in yet another June, over a Long Island dinner table. This time it is Fenno who meets and captivates Fern, the same woman who captivated his father in Greece ten years before. Now pregnant with a son of her own, Fern, like Fenno and Paul before him, must make peace with her past to embrace her future. Elegantly detailed yet full of emotional suspense, often as comic as it is sad, Three Junes is a glorious triptych about how we learn to live, and live fully, beyond incurable grief and betrayals of the heart—how family ties, both those we’re born into and those we make, can offer us redemption and joy.
  

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Beautiful writing that's easy to read. - Goodreads
The writing was truly lovely and lyrical. - Goodreads
I liked the writing and the family drama. - Goodreads

Review: Three Junes

User Review  - Tracy - Goodreads

Oh, I really enjoyed this. Beautiful writing that's easy to read. A family of characters rendered truthfully. I especially liked Fenno's story (the longest part of the book). Would definitely read more by her. Read full review

Review: Three Junes

User Review  - Stacy - Goodreads

I liked Paul very much, but wasn't really drawn into his story. There wasn't enough going on for me. I loved the middle section told from Fenno's perspective. He wasn't the most likeable character ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
5
Section 3
9
Section 4
11
Section 5
25
Section 6
26
Section 7
45
Section 8
49
Section 19
193
Section 20
212
Section 21
228
Section 22
229
Section 23
251
Section 24
267
Section 25
287
Section 26
297

Section 9
51
Section 10
61
Section 11
88
Section 12
108
Section 13
125
Section 14
126
Section 15
137
Section 16
151
Section 17
165
Section 18
167
Section 27
301
Section 28
304
Section 29
325
Section 30
327
Section 31
331
Section 32
339
Section 33
354
Section 34
355
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Julia Glass's first novel, Three Junes, won the 2002 National Book Award for Fiction and was also a selection of ABC/ "Good Morning America"'s READ THIS! Book Club. Her fiction has been honored with a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship, a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, three Nelson Algren Fiction Awards, the Tobias Wolff Award, and the Pirate's Alley Faulkner Society Medal for Best Novella. She is spending the 2004-2005 academic year as a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies, where she is finishing her second novel, A Piece of Cake. Currently, she lives outside Boston with her family.

"From the Trade Paperback edition."

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