Astrophysical Formulae (Google eBook)

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Springer Science & Business Media, Apr 11, 2006 - 1094 pages
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This classic reference for the fundamental formulae of physics and astrophysics has become part of nearly every astronomers and astrophysicists library. "A magnificent compendium" - OPTICA ACTA (ON THE FIRST EDITION)
  

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Contents

I
1
III
2
IV
4
V
5
VI
6
VIII
7
IX
8
XIII
9
XCVII
238
XCVIII
244
XCIX
248
C
249
CI
250
CII
251
CIII
253
CV
254

XIV
11
XV
12
XVI
14
XVII
15
XVIII
16
XX
17
XXII
19
XXIII
20
XXIV
21
XXV
25
XXVI
26
XXVII
36
XXVIII
41
XXIX
43
XXX
45
XXXI
48
XXXII
51
XXXIII
55
XXXIV
59
XXXV
62
XXXVI
65
XXXVII
67
XXXVIII
68
XXXIX
69
XL
72
XLI
74
XLII
78
XLIII
80
XLIV
84
XLV
86
XLVI
91
XLVIII
94
XLIX
95
L
96
LI
97
LII
98
LIII
99
LIV
101
LV
102
LVI
104
LVII
109
LVIII
116
LIX
125
LX
139
LXI
146
LXII
150
LXIII
157
LXIV
160
LXV
166
LXVI
176
LXVII
185
LXVIII
188
LXX
192
LXXI
195
LXXII
199
LXXIV
200
LXXV
202
LXXVI
203
LXXVIII
206
LXXIX
208
LXXX
209
LXXXI
211
LXXXII
212
LXXXIII
213
LXXXIV
214
LXXXV
215
LXXXVI
216
LXXXVII
217
LXXXVIII
219
LXXXIX
222
XC
223
XCI
224
XCII
225
XCIII
226
XCIV
227
XCV
232
XCVI
236
CVI
256
CVII
257
CVIII
263
CIX
264
CX
265
CXI
267
CXII
273
CXIII
278
CXIV
281
CXV
293
CXVI
296
CXVII
300
CXVIII
301
CXIX
305
CXX
308
CXXI
311
CXXII
314
CXXIII
320
CXXIV
321
CXXV
324
CXXVII
328
CXXVIII
329
CXXIX
331
CXXXI
333
CXXXII
334
CXXXIII
337
CXXXIV
340
CXXXVI
341
CXXXVII
342
CXXXVIII
343
CXL
344
CXLI
347
CXLII
351
CXLIII
352
CXLIV
354
CXLV
356
CXLVI
361
CXLVII
366
CXLVIII
368
CXLIX
374
CL
375
CLI
378
CLII
379
CLIII
381
CLIV
382
CLVI
384
CLVII
387
CLVIII
394
CLIX
400
CLX
402
CLXI
406
CLXII
414
CLXIII
417
CLXIV
419
CLXV
424
CLXVI
429
CLXVII
432
CLXVIII
433
CLXIX
434
CLXX
435
CLXXII
436
CLXXIII
437
CLXXIV
438
CLXXV
439
CLXXVI
440
CLXXVIII
453
CLXXIX
455
CLXXX
456
CLXXXI
458
CLXXXIII
460
CLXXXIV
466
CLXXXV
470
CLXXXVI
475
CLXXXVII
573
CLXXXVIII
591
Copyright

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Page xix - Suppose, for distinctness of statement, that the primary ray is vertical, and that the plane of vibration is that of the meridian. The intensity of the light scattered by a small particle is constant, and a maximum, for rays which lie in the vertical plane running east and west, while there is no scattered ray along the north and south line. If the primary ray is unpolarked, the light scattered north and south is entirely due to that component which vibrates east and west, and is therefore perfectly...
Page xix - It is now, I believe, generally admitted that the light which we receive from the clear sky is due in one way or another to small suspended particles which divert the light from its regular course.

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About the author (2006)

Kenneth R. Lang is Professor of Astronomy at Tufts University. He is the author of many popular astronomy books, including The Cambridge Guide to the Solar System, 2nd edition (2011), Sun, Earth, and Sky, 2nd edition (2006) and Wanderers in Space (1994). An expert in radio astronomy and astrophysics, his research examines how magnetic energy generates explosions on the Sun.

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