History of Tennessee: Its People and Its Institutions from the Earliest Times to the Year 1903 (Google eBook)

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Brandon Printing Company, 1903 - Tennessee - 357 pages
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Contents

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Page 321 - That all power is inherent in the people, and all free governments are founded on their authority and instituted for their peace, safety and happiness.
Page 335 - Any amendment or amendments to this constitution may be proposed in the senate and assembly; and if the same shall be agreed to by a majority of the members elected to each of the two houses, such proposed amendment or amendments shall be entered on their journals with the yeas...
Page 335 - ... and if, in the Legislature so next chosen as aforesaid, such proposed amendment or amendments shall be agreed to by a majority of all the members elected to each House, then it shall be the duty of the Legislature to submit such proposed amendment or amendments to the people in such manner and at such time as the Legislature shall prescribe...
Page 330 - All impeachments shall be tried by the Senate; when sitting for that purpose the Senators shall be upon oath or affirmation, to do justice according to law and evidence: no person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of the members present.
Page 323 - In prosecutions for the publication of papers, investigating the official conduct of officers, or men in a public capacity, or where the matter published is proper for public information, the truth thereof may be given in evidence; and, in all indictments for libels, the jury shall have a right to determine the law and the facts, under the direction of the court, as in other cases.
Page 328 - House of the General Assembly. The person having the highest number of votes shall be Governor; but if two or more shall be equal and highest in votes, one of them shall be chosen Governor by joint vote of both Houses of the General Assembly.
Page 327 - All property, real, personal or mixed, shall be taxed, but. the legislature may except such as may be held by the State by counties, cities or towns, and used exclusively for public or corporation purposes, and such as may be held and used for purposes purely religious, charitable, scientific, literary or educational, and shall except one thousand dollars...
Page 335 - No corporation shall be created by special laws, or its charter extended, changed or amended, except those for charitable, educational, penal or reformatory purposes, which are to be and remain under the patronage and control of the state, but the general assembly shall provide, by general laws, for the organization of all corporations hereafter to be created.
Page 335 - The Legislature shall have no power to suspend any general law for the benefit of any particular individual, nor to pass any law for the benefit of individuals inconsistent with the general laws of the land; nor to pass any law granting to any individual or individuals rights, privileges, immunities Or exemptions, other than such as may be, by the same law, extended to any member of the community who may be able to bring himself within the provisions of such law.
Page 325 - Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two-thirds, expel a member, but not a second time for the same cause; and shall have all other powers necessary for a branch of the legislature of a free state.

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