The Movie Lovers Club: How to Start Your Own Film Group (Google eBook)

Front Cover
New World Library, Feb 9, 2011 - Reference - 256 pages
1 Review
Large screen TVs and full-line DVD services have liberated movie lovers from fear of parking and stale popcorn. Across the country, movie lovers are staying in and creating their own version of book clubs — but without the homework. The Movie Lovers’ Club — the only guide for movie nights with friends — motivates readers to form their own Lovers’ Club clubs to explore the more than 100 excellent film suggestions, summaries, critical reviews, and insider anecdotes. Author Cathleen Rountree offers a year’s worth of must-see classic, contemporary, independent, and foreign films and provocative discussion questions to keep the cinematic conversation lively. With everything readers need to know to start a Movie Lovers’ Club, the book’s selections run the gamut and include powerful films such as To Kill a Mockingbird, Henry and June, and Real Women Have Curves. Whether you need advice for a political group, a girls’ night out party, or a band of indie film devotees, movie watching reaches new depths with ideas on where, when, and how to launch a film group.
  

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The Movie Lovers' Club: How to Start Your Own Film Group

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

A novel approach to viewing movies with friends is via a movie club. In this manual, Rountree (The Writer's Mentor: A Guide to Putting Passion on Paper ) shows how to set up and maintain such a group ... Read full review

Review: The Movie Lovers' Club: How to Start Your Own Film Group

User Review  - Josh T - Goodreads

Extremely misleading title. This book is simply 1 person's experience as a leader of film discussion group. Not helpful for someone aiming to start a film discussion group of their own. Most of the ... Read full review

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About the author (2011)

A lifelong movie lover, Cathleen Rountree researches and writes about the confluence of cinema, psychology, and cultural mythology. She speaks regularly at film, writing, and women's conferences throughout the U.S., and teaches writing at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She lives in Aptos, California.

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