The Complete Poetical Works of William Wordsworth, in Ten Volumes - Vol. VII: 1816-1822 (Google eBook)

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Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2008 - Poetry - 412 pages
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First published in London in 1888, this is the complete works of one of the great poets of English Romanticism in ten charming, compact volumes. WILLIAM WORDSWORTH (1770-1850), Britain's Poet Laureate from 1843 until his death, limned some of the finest verse in the English language, tender poetry on human love and the natural world-some of his most memorable lines describe England's beautiful Lake District, where he spent much of his life, as filtered through his sensitive and serious heart. Beloved of readers for centuries, Wordsworth's timeless verse is a treasure to enjoy for the nourishment of one's own soul, and to share with other lovers of language.
  

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Contents

Ode The Morning of the Day appointed
3
Ode
15
Invocation to the Earth February 1816
21
Ode
30
On the same Occasion
36
Emperors and Kings how oft have temples
42
Feelings of a French Royalist on the Disinter
43
To on her First Ascent to the Summit
56
Crusaders
299
As FAITH THUS SANCTIFIED THE WARBIObs crest
300
Where long and deeply hath been fixed the root
301
Transubstantiation
302
The Vaudois
303
Praised be the Rivers from their mountain springs
304
Waldenses
305
Archbishop Chichely to Henry V
306

The Longest Day Addressed to my Daughter
71
Sequel to the Beggars 1802 Composed many
85
The Pilgrims Dream oh The Star and the Glow
87
Composed upon an Evening of Extraordinary
97
Malham Cove
103
Aerial Rock whose solitary brow
105
To the River Derwent
111
The Haunted Tree To
117
There is a little unpretending Rill
124
The stars are mansions built by Natures
127
MEMORIALS OF A TOUR ON THE CONTINENT
133
Hymn fob the Boatmen as they approach the Rapids under the Castle of Heidel berg
143
The Source of the Danube
145
On approaching the Staubbach Lauter BRUNNEN
146
The Fall of the Aar Handec
147
Memorial near the Outlet of the Lake of Thun
148
Composed in one of the Catholic Can tons
150
Afterthought
151
Scene on the Lake of Bhientz
152
Engelberg the Hill of Angels
153
Our Lady of the Snow
154
Effusion in Presence of the Painted Tower of Tell at Altorf
156
The Town of Schwytz
158
On hearing the Ranz des Vaches on the Top of the Pass of St Gothard
159
Fort Fuentes
160
The Three Cottage Girls
176
SkyProspect from the Plain
193
THE RIVER DUDDON A Series of Sonnets
202
Sole listener Duddon to the breeze that played
212
Flowers
213
Change me some God into that breath ing rose
214
What aspect bore the Man who roved or fled
215
The SteppingStones
216
The Same Subject
217
The Faery Chasm
218
Hints for the Fancy
219
Open Prospect
220
O mountain Stream the Shepherd and his Cot
221
From this deep chasm where quivering sunbeams play
222
American Tradition
223
Return
224
Seathwaite Chapel
225
Tributary Stream
226
The Plain of Donnerdale
227
Return Content for fondly I pur
233
Not hurled precipitous from steep
239
Conclusion
240
Afterthought
241
A Parsonage in Oxfordshire
242
To Enterprise
243
ECCLESIASTICAL SONNETS In Series
251
From the Introduction of Christian ity into Britain to the Consummation of the Papal Dominion 1 Introduction
253
Conjectures
254
Trepidation of the Druids
255
Druidical Excommunication
256
Uncertainty
257
Persecution
258
Recovery
259
Temptations from Roman Refinements
260
Dissensions
261
Struggle of the Britons against the Barbarians
262
Saxon Conquest
263
Monastery of Old Bangor
264
Missions and Travels
277
To the close of the troubles
292
Other Benefits
297
Continued
298
Wars of York and Lancaster
307
Wicliffe
308
Corruptions of the higher Clergy
309
Abuse of Monastic Power
310
Monastic Voluptuousness
311
Dissolution of the Monasteries
312
The Same Subject
313
Continued
314
Saints
315
The Virgin
316
Apology
317
Imaginative Regrets
318
Reflections
319
Translation of the Bible
320
The Point at issue
321
Edward VI
322
Edward signing the Warrant for the Execution of Joan of Kent
323
Revival of Popery
324
Latimer and Ridley
325
Cranmer
326
General View of the Troubles of the Reformation
327
English Reformers in Exile
328
Elizabeth
329
Eminent Reformers
330
The Same
331
Distractions
332
Gunpowder Plot
333
Illustration The JungFrau and the Fall of the Rhine near Schaffhausen
334
Troubles of Charles the First
335
Laud
336
Afflictions of England
337
From the Restoration to the Pre sent Times
338
I Saw the figure of a lovely Maid
339
Patriotic Sympathies
340
Charles the Second
341
Latitudinarianism
342
Waltons Book of Lives
343
Clerical Integrity
344
Persecution of the Scottish Covenanters
345
Acquittal of the Bishops
346
William the Third
347
Obligations of civil to religious liberty
348
Sacheverel
349
Down a swift Stream thus far a bold
350
Pastoral Character
356
Confirmation continued
362
The Commination Service
367
Foems of Prayer at Sea
368
Funeral Service
369
Rural Ceremony
370
Regrets
371
Mutability
372
Old Abbeys
373
Emigrant French Clergy
374
Congratulation
375
New Churches
376
Church to be erected
377
Continued
378
New Churchyard
379
Cathedrals etc
380
Inside op Kings College Chapel Cam bridge
381
The Same
382
Continued
383
Ejaculation
384
Conclusion
385
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About the author (2008)

William Wordsworth, 1770 - 1850 Born April 7, 1770 in the "Lake Country" of northern England, the great English poet William Wordsworth, son of a prominent aristocrat, was orphaned at an early age. He attended boarding school in Hawkesmead and, after an undistinguished career at Cambridge, he spent a year in revolutionary France, before returning to England a penniless radical. Wordsworth later received honorary degrees from the University of Durham and Oxford University. He is best known for his work "The Prelude", which was published after his death. For five years, Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy lived very frugally in rural England, where they met Samuel Taylor Coleridge. "Lyrical Ballads", published anonymously in 1798, led off with Coleridge's "Ancient Mariner" and ended with Wordsworth's "Tintern Abbey". Between these two masterworks are at least a dozen other great poems. "Lyrical Ballads" is often said to mark the beginning of the English romantic revolution. A second, augmented edition in 1800 was prefaced by one of the great manifestos in world literature, an essay that called for natural language in poetry, subject matter dealing with ordinary men and women, a return to emotions and imagination, and a conception of poetry as pleasure and prophecy. Together with Robert Southey, these three were known as the "Lake Poets", the elite of English poetry. Before he was 30, Wordsworth had begun the supreme work of his life, The Prelude, an immensely long autobiographical work on "The Growth of the Poet's Mind," a theme unprecedented in poetry. Although first finished in 1805, The Prelude was never published in Wordsworth's lifetime. Between 1797 and 1807, he produced a steady stream of magnificent works, but little of his work over the last four decades of his life matters greatly. "The Excursion", a poem of epic length, was considered by Hazlitt and Keats to be among the wonders of the age. After "Lyrical Ballads", Wordsworth turned to his own life, his spiritual and poetical development, as his major theme. More than anyone else, he dealt with mysterious affinities between nature and humanity. Poems like the "Ode on the Intimations of Immortality" have a mystical power quite independent of any particular creed, and simple lyrics like "The Solitary Reaper" produced amazingly powerful effects with the simplest materials. Wordsworth also revived the sonnet and is one of the greatest masters of that form. Wordsworth is one of the giants of English poetry and criticism, his work ranging from the almost childishly simple to the philosophically profound. Wordsworth married Mary Hutchinson in 1802 and in 1813, obtained a sinecure as distributor of stamps for Westmoreland. At this stage of his life, Wordsworth's political beliefs had strayed from liberal to staunchly conservative. His last works were published around 1835, a few trickled in as the years went on, but the bulk of his writing had slowed. In 1842 he was awarded a government pension and in 1843 became the Poet Laureate of England, after the post was vacated by his friend Coleridge. Wordsworth wrote over 523 sonnets in the course of his lifetime. Wordsworth died at Rydal Mount on April 23, 1850. He is buried in Grasme Curchyard. He was 80 years old.

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