Mothers and infants, nurses and nursing (Google eBook)

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Phillips, Sampson and Co., 1859 - 303 pages
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Page 49 - A woman of forty years of age having lost 209 one after another, several children, all of which she had put out to nurse, determined to nurse the last one herself. This woman being vigorous and well built, was eager for the work, and, filled with devotion and spirit, she gave herself up to the nursing of her child with a sort of fury. At nine months she still nursed him from fifteen to twenty times a day. Having become extremely emaciated, she fell all at once into a state of weakness, from which...
Page 67 - The parts in solution are principally caseine, which is the basis of cheese, a particular kind of sugar, which is known by the name of sugar of milk, and a great number of saline substances necessary to the constitution of animals. The solid parts held in suspension have but one single nature ; this is the fat or buttery part of the milk, — that which produces butter properly so called. We may obtain, then, a just idea of the constitution of this liquid, if we look upon it as a soft, liquid substance,...
Page 49 - Donne relates the following instructive cases, which show the danger which sometimes attends suckling, and the imperative necessity which may arise of discontinuing it. "A very light-complexioned young mother, in very good health, and of a good constitution, though somewhat delicate, was nursing for the third time, and as regarded the child successfully. All at once this young woman experienced a feeling of exhaustion. Her skin became constantly hot ; there were cough, oppression, night-sweats ;...
Page 27 - Hagg. mariner, not at all described or noticed in the act, which imposes no new obligations, but only recognizes some of the known duties imposed by the law ; and contenting itself with that, if it does no good, it at least does no harm, beyond the payment of a small fee to the scrivener or printer, for this unnecessary enlargement of the instrument.
Page 71 - ... contains the richer and more .substantial it is ; so that microscopic examination enables us, promptly and certainly, to appreciate the greater or less degree of the richness of milk. In fact, the differences are often so marked that they will strike the least practiced observer at once: one specimen of milk presenting a prodigious number of globules, all regular, well formed, and of good size, whilst in another they are very small, infrequent, and present the appearance of fine light dust, scattered...
Page 67 - ... sugar, &c., are dissolved, and the fatty or oily substance is divided into little rounded particles. These different parts, mixed together, are not distinguishable by the naked eye : but if we place a drop on a watch-glass, and examine it with a microscope magnifying 300 times, we perceive a multitude of transparent, rounded granules, resembling small pearls, swimming in a limpid liquid. These little balls, of which frequently more than a hundred ranged side by side are required to form...
Page 42 - We see some women, having little appetite, and eating but little, during the whole period of nursing, who are, notwithstanding, pretty good nurses, — • whose children thrive pretty well ; but I do not fear to affirm that the want of sleep, or that an imperfect sleep, inevitably and rapidly brings on a loss both of strength and of milk, particularly with ladies of a constitution always more or less nervous.
Page 48 - A very light-complexioned young mother, in very good health, and of a good constitution, though somewhat delicate, was nursing for the third time, and, as regarded the child, successfully. All at once this young woman experienced a feeling of exhaustion. Her skin became constantly hot; there were cough, oppression night-sweats ; her strength visibly declined, and in less than a fortnight she presented the ordinary symptoms of consumption. The nursing was immediately abandoned, and, from the moment...
Page 66 - I will render them as short and as clear as possible. The milk is composed of several distinct parts. Of these parts, some are in a dissolved state, as sugar exists in a state of solution in the water we have dissolved it in ; other parts are in a solid state, and float in the liquid in the form of very fine atoms. The parts in solution are principally...
Page 49 - A woman of forty years of age . . . having lost, one after another, several children, all of whom she had put out to nurse, determined to nurse the last one herself. . . . This woman, being vigorous and well-built, was eager for the work, and, filled with devotion and spirit, she gave herself up to the nursing of her child with a sort of fury. At nine months, she still nursed him from fifteen to twenty times a day. Having become extremely emaciated, she fell all at once into a state of weakness,...

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