Children Who Remember Previous Lives: A Question of Reincarnation, rev. ed. (Google eBook)

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McFarland, Dec 1, 2000 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 355 pages
7 Reviews
This is the revised edition of Dr. Stevenson's 1987 book, summarizing for general readers almost forty years of experience in the study of children who claim to remember previous lives. For many Westerners the idea of reincarnation seems remote and bizarre; it is the author's intent to correct some common misconceptions. New material relating to birthmarks and birth defects, independent replication studies with a critique of criticisms, and recent developments in genetic study are included. The work gives an overview of the history of the belief in and evidence for reincarnation. Representative cases of children, research methods used, analyses of the cases and of variations due to different cultures, and the explanatory value of the idea of reincarnation for some unsolved problems in psychology and medicine are reviewed.
  

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Review: Children Who Remember Previous Lives: A Question of Reincarnation

User Review  - Delia O' Riordan - Goodreads

Dr. Ian Stevenson lived to be 99 and the body of work he left behind reflects that. In his long life he had to courage to do what only great scientists do: he went where the evidence took him ... Read full review

Review: Children Who Remember Previous Lives: A Question of Reincarnation

User Review  - Alienstyle - Goodreads

Extremely modern, extremely cautious - & thus quite subtle in effect. Read full review

Contents

2940 ch 2
29
4155 ch 3
41
5693 ch 4
56
94128 ch 5
94
129145 ch 6
129
146168 ch 7
146
169180 ch 8
169
181206 ch 9
181
207232 ch 10
207
233254 ch 11
233
255260 appendix
255
261314 notes
261
315334 references
315
335345 index
335
Copyright

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Page 19 - Tired with the cold of yesterday, I was glad to take advantage of a hot bath before I turned in. And here a most remarkable thing happened to me — so remarkable that I must tell the story from the beginning. After I left the High School, I went with G , my most intimate friend, to attend the classes in the university. There was no divinity class, but we frequently in our walks discussed and speculated upon many grave subjects — among others, on the immortality of the soul, and on a future state....
Page 19 - ... out of the bath I know not, but on recovering my senses I found myself sprawling on the floor. The apparition, or whatever it was that had taken the likeness of G , had disappeared.
Page 20 - I have just been copying out from my journal the account of this strange dream: Certissima mortis imago! And now to finish the story, begun above sixty years since.
Page 19 - How I got out of the bath I know not, but on recovering my senses I found myself sprawling on the floor.
Page 19 - ... to my eyes was a dream, I cannot for a moment doubt ; yet for years I had had no communication with G , nor had there been anything to recall him to my recollection ; nothing had taken place during our Swedish travels either connected with G or with India, or with anything relating to him or to any member of his family. I recollected quickly enough our old discussion, and the bargain we had made. I could not discharge from my mind the impression that G must have died, and that his appearance...
Page 19 - ... the immortality of the soul, and on a future state. This question, and the possibility, I will not say of ghosts walking, but of the dead appearing to the living, were subjects of much speculation ; and we actually committed the folly of drawing up an agreement, written with our blood, to the effect, that whichever of us died the first should appear to the other, and thus solve any doubts we had entertained of the

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About the author (2000)

The late Ian Stevenson, M.D., was a research professor of psychiatry at the University of Virginia. He lived in Charlottesville.

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