The Art of Love

Front Cover
Kessinger Publishing, Dec 1, 2004 - Literary Criticism - 128 pages
87 Reviews
This scarce antiquarian book is a selection from Kessinger Publishings Legacy Reprint Series. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving, and promoting the worlds literature. Kessinger Publishing is the place to find hundreds of thousands of rare and hard-to-find books with something of interest for everyone!

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Review: The Art of Love

User Review  - James Violand - Goodreads

A delightful romp through the humorous and profane world of love. I laughed out loud over Pasiphae's love of the bull that led to the Minotaur. Very risque but funny in the extreme. Read full review

Review: The Art of Love

User Review  - James Violand - Goodreads

A delightful romp through the humorous and profane world of love. I laughed out loud over Pasiphae's love of the bull that led to the Minotaur. Very risque but funny in the extreme. Read full review

About the author (2004)

Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC--AD 17/18), known as Ovid. Born of an equestrian family in Sulmo, Ovid was educated in rhetoric in Rome but gave it up for poetry. He counted Horace and Propertius among his friends and wrote an elegy on the death of Tibullus. He became the leading poet of Rome but was banished in 8 A.D. by an edict of Augustus to remote Tomis on the Black Sea because of a poem and an indiscretion. Miserable in provincial exile, he died there ten years later. His brilliant, witty, fertile elegiac poems include Amores (Loves), Heroides (Heroines), and Ars Amatoris (The Art of Love), but he is perhaps best known for the Metamorphoses, a marvelously imaginative compendium of Greek mythology where every story alludes to a change in shape. Ovid was admired and imitated throughout the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Jonson knew his works well. His mastery of form, gift for narration, and amusing urbanity are irresistible.

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