An Abridgment of Lectures on Rhetorick (Google eBook)

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Hill and Moore, 1822 - English language - 304 pages
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Page 244 - Then the eyes of the blind shall be opened, and the ears of the deaf shall be unstopped. Then shall the lame man leap as an hart, and the tongue of the dumb sing: for in the wilderness shall waters break out, and streams in the desert.
Page 240 - Swinging slow with sullen roar ; Or, if the air will not permit, Some still removed place will fit, Where glowing embers through the room Teach Light to counterfeit a gloom, Far from all resort of mirth, Save the cricket on the hearth...
Page 93 - OUR sight is the most perfect and most delightful of all our senses. It fills the mind with the largest variety of ideas, converses with its objects at the greatest distance, and continues the longest in action without being tired or satiated with its proper enjoyments.
Page 142 - There are few words in the English language which are employed in a more loose and uncircumscribed sense than those of the fancy and the imagination. I therefore thought it necessary to fix and determine the notion of these two words, as I intend to make use of them in the thread of my following Speculations, that the reader may conceive rightly what is the subject which I proceed upon.
Page 243 - O SING unto the Lord a new song: sing unto the Lord, all the earth.
Page 140 - Our sight seems designed to supply all these defects, and may be considered as a more delicate and diffusive kind of touch, that spreads itself over an infinite multitude of bodies, comprehends the largest figures, and brings into our' reach some of the most remote parts of the universe...
Page 24 - And he rode upon a cherub, and did fly : yea, he did fly upon the wings of the wind.
Page 226 - How happy is the blameless vestal's lot ? The world forgetting, by the world forgot : Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind ! Each prayer accepted and each wish resign'd ; Labour and rest, that equal periods keep ; " Obedient slumbers that can wake and weep ;" Desires composed, affections ever even ; Tears that delight, and sighs that waft to heaven.
Page 87 - The pleasures of the imagination, taken in their full extent, are not so gross as those of sense, nor so refined as those of the understanding.
Page 93 - But God be thanked, his pride is greater than his ignorance, and what he wants in knowledge, he supplies by sufficiency. When he has looked about him as far as he can, he concludes there, is no more to be seen; when he is at the end of his line, he is at the bottom of the ocean; when he has shot his best, he is sure, none ever did nor ever can shoot better or beyond it. His own reason is the certain measure of truth, his own knowledge, of what is possible in nature...

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