School Administration and School Reports (Google eBook)

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Houghton Mifflin Company, 1920 - Education - 200 pages
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Page 18 - 2. Public education should strive gradually to emancipate each pupil from external restraint and guidance, and thus render him self-directing intellectually, morally, and physically stable; alert, vigorous, and active. Together with the instruction public education offers, it should, therefore, insist throughout on discipline that is wise, kindly, and firm, including appropriate punishment when
Page 185 - During the past thirty years the conception of what it means to be a teacher has been greatly enriched. It has always been known that the work of the teacher is important; that the most important factor in a good school is the teacher; that unless the teacher is scholarly, enthusiastic, and devoted to his work,
Page 21 - for pupils over eighteen years of age who are at work during the daytime. (d) Vocational high schools vocational schools of secondary grade. (1) High schools of commerce. (2) High schools of practical arts (technical high schools. (3) Agricultural high schools.
Page 19 - various kinds of vocational training adapted to the needs, tastes, and future callings of all pupils who pass at once from school to their life-work, and, for those who wish to improve themselves after they have gone to work; preparation for specific social service
Page 21 - schools of secondary grade. (1) High schools of commerce. (2) High schools of practical arts (technical high schools. (3) Agricultural high schools. (4) Or well-organized separate departments of (1), (2), and (3) for vocational instruction in general high schools.
Page 28 - All this results from the settled policy of the State from an early date to divorce the business of public education from all other municipal
Page 21 - But the American people are not satisfied with schools for normal children only. They acknowledge their obligation to do all that can be done for exceptional children as well; hence they provide also schools or classes for:
Page 20 - they can be rendered interesting, intelligible, and accessible to children and youth of school age; that is to say, the school program, the program of studies must cover: (a) The school
Page 19 - for usefulness in a vocation. They must therefore provide: I. The elements of general culture, comprising an insight into, appreciation of, and power to deal with, the recorded ideals and experience of the race; and all worthy interests of contemporary life, so far as
Page 19 - self-discovery and self-realization, and preparation for general social service for every pupil; and second, various kinds of vocational training adapted to the needs, tastes, and future callings of all pupils who pass at once from school to their life-work, and, for those who wish to improve themselves after they have gone to work; preparation for specific social service

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