I Have Heard the Mermaids Singing

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Free Association Books, 2005 - Fiction - 170 pages
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This dark comic novella follows the life of ‚??the psychoanalyst‚? in an urban village engaging a cast of characters with whom he shares his life and his ideas. A vulnerable yet thoughtful person shadowed by what he refers to as life after the Catastrophe, he finds himself celebrating ‚??depression‚?, discovering how it is an essential emotion housing insight into the self, society, and world affairs. Amusing, disturbing and thought provoking, the novella reveals in remarkable depth the many faces of depression. The psychoanalyst agonizes over the increasingly fascist dimensions of his profession and provides an excoriating critique of the psychotropic movement. He challenges the world of modern psychology that by stereotyping souls as sufferers of one or another of the newly coined diagnoses, such as Attention Deficit Disorder, ordains a world that reduces humanity. Where thoughtfulness once was, now one discovers a pill, a fashionable new illness, and a twelve-step program that define a life. The arrival of a terrorist in his consulting room seeking treatment in order to carry out a suicide bombing serves as a pivot for other crises that involve the analyst in an increasingly anarchic and surreal era, one that suggests a new world order. Readers will find in this work new perspectives that challenge many assumptions, ironically suggesting that in these difficult times understanding our complex mental lives ‚?? as in depression ‚?? holds invaluable keys to a better future for the individual and for modern society.

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Contents

Oh what a lovely depression
1
So if all the worlds a stage
31
In the Maze
62
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Christopher Bollas is a member of the British Psychoanalytical Society, the Los Angeles Institute and Society for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Honorary Member of the Institute for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. He is a member of ESGUT, the European Study Group of Unconscious Thought.

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