The Miscellaneous Works of Edward Gibbon, Esq: With Memoirs of His Life and Writings (Google eBook)

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B. Blake, 1837 - English literature - 848 pages
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Contents

Mr Gibbon resumes his studies determines to write upon some historical subject
66
Some account of Mr Gibbons studies at Lausanne preparatory to his Italian
77
Mr Gibbon and Mr Deyverdun engage in a periodical work intended as a con
86
Mr Gibbon by the desire of Ministry writes the Memoire Justificatif By
99
Mr Gibbon pays a visit to Lord Sheffield in England Remarks on Lord Shef
108
Narrative continued by Lord Sheffield and by letters from Mr Gibbon
118
Mirabeaus work Sur la Monarchic Prussienne and his Correspondence Secrette
127
Account of Monsieur Necker Character of Mr Burkes book on the French
134
Narrative continued by Lord Sheffield An account of his visit to Lausanne
141
Political reflections Slave Trade Jockey Club Mr Greys motion Con
151
Second letter to the honourable Miss Holroyd Her account in answer of
161
Narrative continued by Lord Sheffield Account of Mr Gibbons health
178
Letter Page Introduction by the Editor to the Letters contained in the Appendix
188
Mr Crevier to Mr Gibbon On a disputed passage in Livy lib xxx c 44
189
The Same to the Same The subject continued Oct 12 1756
192
Professor Breitinger to Mr Gibbon On different passages of Justin Oct 22 1756
195
The Same to the Same The subject continued
201
Mr Gibbon to Mr Gesner Concerning Piso to whom Horace addressed his Art of Poetry and the time of Catulluss death
203
Mr Gesner to Mr Gibbon In answer to the former
208
Mr Gibbon to Mr Gesner The same subject continued
211
Mr Gibbon to On the government of Berne
216
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Porten 1756
225
Dr Waldegrave to Mr Gibbon Dec 7 1758
227
Mr Mallet to Mr Gibbon Inclosing a letter from Count de Caylus 1761
230
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Gibbon Account of Mr Helvetius Feb 12 1763
234
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd Account oftbeBorromean Islands and Turin May 16 1764
236
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd Account of his return through Paris and of Madame Necker Oct 31 1765
240
The Same to the Same Beriton Oct 16 1769
242
The Same to the Same Nov 18 1771
243
The Same to the Same Feb 3 1772
244
The Same to the Same Princess of Wales Feb 13 1772
245
The Same to the Same Mr Foxs ResignationFeb 211772
246
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd May 26 1772
247
The Same to Mrs Gibbon Aug 7 1772
248
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd Oct 13 1772
254
The Same to the Same Dec 11 1772
255
The Same to the Same EastIndia affairs January 12 1773
256
The Same to the Same at Edinburgh David Hume c Aug 71773
257
The Same to the Same from PortEliot Sept 10 1773
258
The Same to the Same Jan 1774
259
The Same to the Same 1774
260
The Same to the Same Boston Port Bill March 6 1774
261
The Same to the Same Account of Mr Clarkes Death April 21774
262
The Same to the Same April 21 1774
263
Letter Page 52 Mr Gibbon to Mrs Gibbon May 241774
264
The Same to Mr Holroyd May 24 1774
265
The Same to the Same Dec 2 1774
266
The Same to Mrs Gibbon Jan 31 1775
267
The Same to the Same Parliamentary Feb 25 1775
268
The Same to the Same May 2 1775
269
Dr Watson to Mr Gibbon On the same subject Nov 4 1776
279
The Same to the Same Political Nov 22 1776
280
The Same to the Same American affairs 1777
281
The Same to the Same April 191777
282
The Same to the Same From Calais May 7 1777
283
Dr Robertson to Mr Gibbon In Answer 1777
285
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd Account of his visitto Paris June 161777
286
The Same to the Same The same subject Aug 13 1777
287
The Same tothe Same Nov 1777
289
The Same to the Same Dec 1777
290
The Same to the Same Jane 12 1778
292
The Same to the Same Spanish preparations Sept 25 1778
293
Dr Watson to Mr Gibbon Jan 14 1779
294
Dr Robertson to Mr Gibbon On his vindication March 10 1779
295
The Same to the Same May 1779
296
The Same to the Same On being appointed Lord of Trade July 21779
297
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd On his election for Coventry Feb 7 1780
298
The Same to the Same Lord George Gordon June 6 1780
299
The Same to the Same The same subject June 10 1780
300
The Same to Mrs Gibbon Dec 21 1780
301
Mr Gibbon to Lady Sheffield 1781
303
Lord Hardwicke to the Same Sept 20 1781
304
Dr Robertson to the Same With a character of Hayleys Essay on His tory Nov 6 1781
305
The Same to the Same Change in the ministry character of Mr Hayleys poetry July 3 1782
306
The Same to Lord Sheffield New administration 1782
307
The Same to the Same Political Oct 14 1782
308
The Same to the Same Jan 17 1783
309
Dr Priestley to Mr Gibbon In answer Feb 3 1783
310
Mr Gibbon to Dr Priestley Feb 6 1783
312
Dr Priestley to Mr Gibbon Feb 25 1783
313
Mr Deyverdun to Mr Gibbon In answer June 10 1783
316
Mr Gibbon to Mr Deyverdun Upon the same subject June 24 1783
321
Mr Deyverdun to Mr Gibbon In answer
326
Mr Gibbon to Lord Sheffield Upon his intention of quitting England July 10 1783
328
The Same to Mr Deyverdun July 31 1783
329
The Same to Lord Sheffield Aug 18 1783
331
LETTEB Page
332
The Same to Lord Sheffield On the dismission of the coalition adminis
346
The Same to the Same On the report of Mr Gibbons death English
363
The Same to Mr Cadell Feb 24 1787
376
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Gibbon On French Affairs c Aug 1 1792
389
The Same to Lord Feb 23 1793
395
Extracts from his Journal
462
A Collection of his Remarks and detached Pieces on different Subjects
559
Outlines of the History of the World
599
Essai sor 1Etude de la Literature
625
Critical Observations on the Design of the Sixth Book of the Eneid
670
A Dissertation on the Subject of LHomme au Masque de Fer
693
A Vindication of some Passages in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth
713
An Address c
834

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Page 31 - What recks it them? What need they? They are sped; And, when they list, their lean and flashy songs Grate on their scrannel pipes of wretched straw; The hungry sheep look up, and are not fed, But, swoln with wind and the rank mist they draw, Rot inwardly, and foul contagion spread : Besides what the grim wolf with privy paw Daily devours apace, and nothing said: But that two-handed engine at the door Stands ready to smite once, and smite no more.
Page 278 - For who, to dumb forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing anxious being e'er resign'd, Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day, Nor cast one longing lingering look behind?
Page 108 - I will not dissemble the first emotions of joy on the recovery of my freedom, and, perhaps, the establishment of my fame. But my pride was soon humbled, and a sober melancholy was spread over my mind, by the idea that I had taken an everlasting leave of an old and agreeable companion, and that whatsoever might be the future fate of my History, the life of the historian must be short and precarious.
Page 722 - And Haman said unto king Ahasuerus, There is a certain people scattered abroad and dispersed among the people in all the provinces of thy kingdom; and their laws are diverse from all people; neither keep they the king's laws: therefore it is not for the king's profit to suffer them.
Page 3 - Who builds a church to God, and not to Fame, Will never mark the marble with his name : Go, search it there, where to be born and die, Of rich and poor makes all the history ; Enough, that Virtue fill'd the space between ; Prov'd by the ends of being, to have been.
Page 55 - The perfect composition, the nervous language, the well-tuned periods of Dr. Robertson, inflamed me to the ambitious hope that I might one day tread in his footsteps : the calm philosophy, the careless inimitable beauties of his friend and rival, often forced me to close the volume with a mixed sensation of delight and despair.
Page 82 - October, 1764, as I sat musing amidst the ruins of the Capitol, while the barefooted friars were singing vespers in the temple of Jupiter,7 that the idea of writing the decline and fall of the city first started to my mind.
Page 4 - It will be proved to thy face that thou hast men about thee that usually talk of a noun and a verb, and such abominable words as no Christian ear can endure to hear.
Page 760 - The religion of the nations was not merely a speculative doctrine professed in the schools or preached in the temples. The innumerable deities and rites of polytheism were closely interwoven with every circumstance of business or pleasure, of public or of private life; and it seemed impossible to escape the observance of them, without, at the same time, renouncing the commerce of mankind, and all the offices and amusements of society.
Page 107 - It was on the day, or rather night, of the 27th of June 1787, between the hours of eleven and twelve, that I wrote the last lines of the last page in a summer-house in my garden. After laying down my pen, I took several turns in a berceau, or covered walk of acacias, which commands a prospect of the country, the lake, and the mountains. The air was temperate, the sky was serene, the silver orb of the moon was reflected from the waters, and all nature was silent.

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