Shooting and Fishing in Lower Brittany: A Complete and Practical Guide to Sportsmen (Google eBook)

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Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts, 1859 - Fishing - 239 pages
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Page 88 - Indeed, few people can have any notion of the cosiness of a yacht's cabin under such circumstances. After having remained for several hours on deck, in the presence of the tempest peering through the darkness at those black liquid walls of water, mounting above you in ceaseless agitation, or tumbling over in cataracts of gleaming foam, the wind roaring through the rigging, timbers creaking as if the ship would break its heart, the spray and rain beating in your face, everything around in tumult...
Page 88 - ... rosebud chintz, the well-furnished book-shelves, and all the innumerable knick-knacks that decorate its walls, little Edith's portrait looking so serene, everything about you as bright and fresh as a lady's boudoir in May Fair, the certainty of being a good three hundred miles from any troublesome shore, all combine to inspire a feeling of comfort and security difficult to describe.
Page 49 - ... between the kitchen and' an odoriferous back-yard, combining in an eminent degree the delicious exhalations of the two, and where, twice a day, two meals are to be served up to some half-dozen of hungry guests. Up-stairs it is no better. " The perfume of the sacrifice...
Page 48 - ... of a market-day, unsaluted by a landlord (is he not playing cards ?), uncared for by the ostler (is he not inebriated ?), an object of wonder to the unsophisticated multitude and the beggars (is not their name Legion ?). " Tis not all gold that glitters" is an ancient proverb, never more truly verified than in the case of our hostelry ; an amount of treasure had the landlord expended in white-washing the outside, while the inside he had left a prey to rats and damp, unmindful of paper peeling...
Page 49 - I see him now, in that felt wideawake, brown-hoi land greasy coat, a pair of unexpressibies, with cloth for the ground-work, but now patched over with sailcloth, standing over a stew, now talking in French to some stranger just arrived, now ehouting in Breton at the unfortunate maid, now throwing in a word or two in English in answer to us never resting ever jabber jabber, clatter clatter; while far aloof, like Helen of old, quite the lady, and not at all bad-looking, stands his wife, neither...
Page 88 - ... black, liquid walls of water, mounting above you in ceaseless agitation, or tumbling over in cataracts of gleaming foam, the wind roaring through the rigging, timbers creaking as if the ship would break its heart, the spray and rain beating in your face, everything around in tumult suddenly to descend into the quiet of a snug, well-lighted, little cabin, with the firelight dancing on the white rosebud chintz, the well-furnished...
Page 49 - a* cends above" which it did here with a vengeance ; but still, it did away with the necessity of a watch ; you knew the time precisely by the intensity of the odour. But here is our host, who has finished his iearte, now preparing for the cooking of our dinner.
Page 48 - ... verified than in the case of our hostelry ; an amount of treasure had the landlord expended in white-washing the outside, while the inside he had left a prey to rats and damp, unmindful of paper peeling off the walls, and an occasional lath peeping out from its proper resting-place. On entering, we find ourselves in a kitchen, to serve in future as a general lounging or sitting-room, amidst the remains of joints, the washing of plates, and the scouring of dishes; there is, indeed, a salle-ti-manger,...
Page 49 - ... standing over a stew, now talking in French to some stranger just arrived, now ehouting in Breton at the unfortunate maid* now throwing in a word or two in English in answer lo us never resting ever jabber jabber, clatter clatter; while far aloof, like Helen of old, quite the lady, and not at all bad-looking, stands his wife, neither caring about nor regarding the passing scene. Are not her hours spent in some pleasant bower, far away from the noisy scene ? Is she to condescend to satisfy...
Page 49 - ... everything, indeed he was in turn, and nothing long." I gee him now, in that felt wideawake, brown-hoi land greasy coat, a pair of unexpessibles, with cloth for the ground-work, but now patched over with sailcloth, standing over a stew, now talking in French to some stranger just arrived now shouting in Breton at the unfortunate maid, now throwing in a word or two in English in answer lo us never resting ever jabber jabber, clatter clatter; while far aloof, like Helen of old, quite the...

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