Why the South Lost the Civil War

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University of Georgia Press, Sep 1, 1991 - History - 624 pages
6 Reviews
In this widely heralded book first published in 1986, four historians consider the popularly held explanations for southern defeat--state-rights disputes, inadequate military supply and strategy, and the Union blockade--undergirding their discussion with a chronological account of the war's progress. In the end, the authors find that the South lacked the will to win, that weak Confederate nationalism and the strength of a peculiar brand of evangelical Protestantism sapped the South's ability to continue a war that was not yet lost on the field.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lsg - LibraryThing

This book is much more than the title implies. It is not just why the South lost the war, but a detailed look at the entire Southern mobilization. It is a partner book to "How the North won", but in my opinion the better of the two. Read full review

Review: Why the South Lost the Civil War

User Review  - Steve - Goodreads

Excellent analysis of some of the many factors which played a part in the defeat of The Confederacy. Unfortunately, a little dry at times. Read full review

Contents

Historians and the Civil
4
PHYSICAL AND MORAL
35
The Impact of the Blockade
53
Southern Nationalism
64
Religion and the Chosen People
82
MILITARY STALEMATE
103
Trial by Battle
128
The Politics of Dreams
156
THE DISSOLUTION
295
Chapter H God Guilt and the Confederacy in Collapse
336
Coming to Terms with Slavery
368
State Rights White Supremacy Honor
398
EPILOGUE
419
Owsleys
443
Confederate Casualties
458
Notes
483

The Union Navy and Combined Operations
185
State Rights and the Confederate War Effort
203
Union Concentration in Time and Space
236
The Battle Is the Lords
268

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About the author (1991)

Richard E. Beringer is a professor of history at the University of North Dakota and the coeditor of a volume of The Papers of Jefferson Davis. Herman Hattaway is a professor of history at the University of Missouri in Kansas City and the coauthor with Archer Jones of How the North Won: A Military History of the Civil War. Archer Jones is emeritus professor of history and former dean at North Dakota State University. William N. Still Jr. is a professor of history at East Carolina University and the author of several books, including Odyssey in Gray: A Diary of Confederate Service, 1863-1865.

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