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" We have, for instance, often heard people distinctly conversing, in a common tone of voice, at the distance of a mile ; and to-day I heard a man singing to himself as he walked along the beach, at even a greater distance than this. "
The London Medical and Physical Journal - Page 262
1821
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 9

History - 1821 - 150 pages
...cold. This is more particularly noticed, however, in the following passage : " We have often heard the people distinctly conversing, In a common tone of voice, at the distance of a mile ; and to-day, (llth his fortune in Repulse Bay, or Sir Thomas Hoe's Welcome ; purposing, if he can find a passage...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 9

Political Science - 1821
...cold. This is more particularly noticed, however, in the following passage : " We have often heard the people distinctly conversing, in a common tone of voice, at the distance of a mile ; and to-day, (llth February) I heard a man singing to himself as he walked along the beach, at even a greater distance...
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The Annals of Philosophy, Volume 2; Volume 18

Thomas Thomson, Richard Phillips, Edward William Brayley - Science - 1821
...notwithstanding the frequency with which he had occasion to remark it. People might often be heard distinctly conversing, in a common tone of voice, at the distance of a mile. Lieutenant Beechy and Messrs. Beverly and Fisher, in the course of a walk which led them to a part...
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The New Annual Register, Or General Repository of History, Politics, and ...

Andrew Kippis, William Godwin - English poetry - 1822
...to us, notwithstanding the frequency with which we had occasion to remark it. We have, for instance, often heard people distinctly conversing, in a common...and to-day I heard a man singing to himself as he wnlked along the beach, at even a greater distance than this. Another circumstance also occurred to-day,...
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A thousand notable things, embracing a collection of scarce receipts, &c. To ...

Thousand notable things, Edward Somerset (2nd marq. of Worcester.) - 1822
...distance of a mile, or more, persons talking together at the ordinary pitch of voice ; and that one day he heard a man singing to himself as he walked along the beach at even a greater distance than that. This fact has been explained by the entire stillness of the air ; being unagitated by any...
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American Farmer containing Original Essays and Selections on Rural Economy ...

John S. Skinner, Editor - 1823
...air during tlie continuance of intense cold, Nvas a matter of great suprise. People were often heard distinctly conversing, in a common tone of voice, at the distance of a mile, and even a greater distance. An artilleryman named John Smith running into the air without his gloves,...
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Time's Telescope for ... ; Or, A Complete Guide to the Almanack

Almanacs, English - 1823
...the continuance of intense cold, afforded matter of considerable surprise: people were often heard distinctly conversing in a common tone of voice at the distance of a mile; and a man was heard singing even at a greater distance than this. At a distance of two miles from the ships,...
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Journals of the first, second and third voyages for the discovery of a north ...

William Edward Parry (sir.) - 1828
...to us, notwithstanding the frequency with which we had occasion to remark it. We have, for instance, often heard people distinctly conversing, in a common...along the beach, at even a greater distance than this. Another circumstance also occurred to-day, which may perhaps be considered as worthy of notice. Lieutenant...
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The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, Volume 8

Science - 1830
...was surprized at the great distance at which the human voice could be heard : " I have," he says, " often heard people distinctly conversing in a common...along the beach at even a greater distance than this." The strong tendency of sound to ascend, again, has great effect. Humboldt remarks the barking of a...
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The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal: Exhibiting a View of the ..., Volume 8

Robert Jameson - Science - 1830
...was surprized at the great distance at which the human voice could be heard : " I have," he says, " often heard people distinctly conversing in a common...along the beach at even a greater distance than this." The strong tendency of sound to ascend, again, has great effect. Humboldt remarks the barking of a...
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