Marie Antoinette in the Conciergerie, a lecture (Google eBook)

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1867
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Page 66 - The whole city crowded out ; at first with a sorrow which was silent. She appeared ; you saw her sunk back into her carriage, her face bathed in tears ; hiding her eyes now with her handkerchief, now with her hands; several times putting out her head to see yet again this Palace of her Fathers, whither she was to return no more. She motioned her regret, her gratitude, to the good Nation, which was crowding here to bid her farewell. Then arose not only tears, but piercing cries, on all sides. Men...
Page 47 - It is now sixteen or seventeen years since I saw the Queen of France, then the dauphiness, at Versailles; and surely never lighted on this orb, which she hardly seemed to touch, a more delightful vision. I saw her just above the horizon, decorating and cheering the elevated sphere she just began to move in— glittering like the morning star, full of life, and splendour, and joy.
Page 63 - At four o'clock on Wednesday morning, after two days and two nights of interrogating, jury-charging, and other darkening of counsel, the result comes out: sentence of Death. "Have you anything to say?" The Accused shook her head, without speech. Night's candles are burning out; and with her too Time is finishing, and it will be Eternity and Day. This Hall of Tinville's is dark, ill-lighted except where she stands. Silently she withdraws from it, to die.
Page 7 - A band of cruel ruffians and assassins, reeking with his blood, rushed into the chamber of the queen, and pierced with an hundred strokes of bayonets and poniards the bed, from whence this persecuted woman had but just time to fly almost naked...
Page 66 - On the morrow," says Weber, an eyewitness, " the dauphiness left Vienna. The whole city crowded out, at first with a sorrow which was silent. She appeared : you saw her sunk back into her carriage ; her face bathed in tears ; hiding her eyes now with her handkerchief, now with her hands ; several times putting out her head to see yet again this Palace of her fathers, whither she was to return no more. She motioned her regret, her gratitude to the good nation, which was crowding here to bid her farewell....
Page 73 - ALONE AMONG THE ZULUS. By a Plain Woman. The Narrative of a Journey through the Zulu Country. With Four full-page Illustrations on toned paper. Crown 8vo. ...Cloth boards i 6 ANNALS OF HARTFELL CHASE. By Miss AC CHAMBERS, author of "Away on the Moorland,
Page 76 - TOY BOOKS for CHILDREN. In an Ornamental Cover. Demy 4to., each containing six large Colored Plates, with Descriptive Letterpress in large type: — I. — PRETTY PICTURES OF PRETTY BIRDS ... 1 0 II.
Page 68 - It is to you, my sister, that I write for the last time. I have just been condemned, not to a shameful death, for such is only for criminals, but to go and rejoin your brother.
Page 76 - DEPOSITORIES : 77, Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields ; 4, Royal Exchange : and 48, Piccadilly.
Page 69 - I embrace you with all my heart, as well as those poor and dear children. . . . My God, how heartrending it is to quit them for ever ! Adieu ! . . . Adieu ! . . . I ought no longer to occupy myself, but with my spiritual duties.

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