Passages from the auto-biography of a "man of Kent": together with a few rough pen-and-ink sketches, by the same hand, of some of the people he has met, the changes he has seen, and the places he has visited ; 1818-1865 (Google eBook)

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Whittingham and Wilkins, 1866 - History - 407 pages
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Page 345 - But when they believed Philip preaching the things concerning the kingdom of God, and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women.
Page 389 - Some natural tears they dropped, but wiped them soon; The world was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide. They, hand in hand, with wandering steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.
Page 115 - Poetry is the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds.
Page 286 - He looks abroad into the varied field Of nature, and, though poor perhaps compared With those whose mansions glitter in his sight, Calls the delightful scenery all his own. His are the mountains, and the valleys his, And the resplendent rivers. His to enjoy With a propriety that none can feel, But who, with filial confidence inspired, Can lift to Heaven an unpresumptuous eye, And smiling say —
Page 90 - Cease ye from man, whose breath is in his nostrils : for wherein is he to be accounted of?
Page 122 - God be thanked for books ! They are the voices of the distant and the dead, and make us heirs of the spiritual life of past ages. Books are the true levellers. They give to all who will faithfully use them, the society, the spiritual presence of the best and greatest of our race.
Page 345 - Then they that gladly received his word were baptized ; and the same day there were added unto them about three thousand souls ; and they continued steadfastly in the apostles' doctrine and fellowship, and in breaking of bread, and in prayers.
Page 232 - That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow • warmer among the ruins of lona.
Page 381 - Would I describe a preacher, such as Paul, ** Were he on earth, would hear, approve, and own, Paul should himself direct me. I would trace His master-strokes, and draw from his design. I would express him simple, grave, sincere; In doctrine uncorrupt; in language plain, ** And plain in manner; decent, solemn, chaste, And natural in gesture ; much impressed Himself, as conscious of his awful charge, And anxious mainly that the flock he feeds May feel it too; affectionate in look, ** And tender in...
Page 45 - Her feet beneath her petticoat Like little mice stole in and out, As if they feared the light: But, oh ! she dances such a way— No sun upon an Easter day Is half so fine a sight.

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