The Nordlings

Front Cover
Second Story Press, 1999 - Juvenile Fiction - 207 pages
3 Reviews
For ages 9 to 13 years. Fifteen-year-old Peggy is trying to run away from her problems at home. Before she can decide what to do, she finds herself thrust back into a long-forgotten fantasy world called Notherland, which she had created as a child. To her astonishment, her imaginary companions are still living there. Peggy finds out that the evil force called Nobodaddy is now threatening to destroy Notherland and all who live there. As the Creator, Peggy is the only one who can stop him. Should she take on the dangerous quest? Or go back to the safety of her real life?
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: The Nordlings (The Notherland Journeys #1)

User Review  - Jennifer Wardrip - Goodreads

Reviewed by Candace Cunard for TeensReadToo.com Many young children fantasize about imaginary friends and imaginary worlds, fictionalizing heroes and villains from their real-life experiences and ... Read full review

Review: The Nordlings (The Notherland Journeys #1)

User Review  - Ian - Goodreads

The basic idea of a teenager visiting the world she created as a child is nice, but the execution feels rushed and the book seems written for a lower demographic than the 15-year olds. Read full review

Contents

Prologue
9
1 Around Again
11
2 The Creator
25
3 Above the Tree Line
42
4 Jackpine
59
5 Lord and Lady
76
6 The Good Ship Terror
93
7 The Great Polar Sea
100
8 Gone
113
9 The Bone Flute
124
10 The Hole at the Pole
137
11 Reluctant Hero
155
12 The Bottom Below
166
13 The Shining World
184
Epilogue
205
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1999)

Kathleen McDonnell has been writing theater and fiction for young people for more than two decades. Her most recent play, The Seven Ravens, was nominated for two Dora Awards in 2003, and she was the recipient of a 1994 Chalmers Canadian Play Award for Loon Boy. She is also the author of The Nordlings, the first installment of The Notherland Journeys, as well as two acclaimed books about children and the media: Kid Culture and Honey, We Lost the Kids.

Bibliographic information