The novels of Sterne, Goldsmith, dr. Johnson, Mackenzie, Horace Walpole, and Clara Reeve. To which are prefixed ... memoirs of the lives of the authors [by sir W. Scott]. (Google eBook)

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1823
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Page 342 - ... transcendental truths, which will always be the same. He must therefore content himself with the slow progress of his name, contemn the applause of his own time, and commit his claims to the justice of posterity. He must write as the interpreter of nature, and the legislator of mankind, and consider himself as presiding over the thoughts and manners of future generations; as a being superior to time and place.
Page 39 - I'll not hurt a hair of thy head: Go, says he, lifting up the sash, and opening his hand as he spoke, to let it escape; go, poor devil, get thee gone, why should I hurt thee? This world surely is wide enough to hold both thee and me.
Page 140 - In a fortnight or three weeks," added my uncle Toby, smiling, " he might march." " He will never march, an' please your honour, in this world," said the; Corporal. " He will march," said my uncle Toby, rising up from the side of the bed, with one shoe off. " An' please your honour," said the Corporal, " he will never march, but to his grave." " He shall march ! " cried my uncle Toby, marching the foot which had a shoe on, though without advancing an inch ; "he shall march to his regiment.
Page 282 - Moses for the fair ; trimming his hair, brushing his buckles, and cocking his hat with pins. The business of the toilet being over, we had at last the satisfaction of seeing him mounted upon the colt, with a deal box before him to bring home groceries in. He had on a coat made of that cloth they call thunder-and-lightning, which, though grown too short, was much too good to be thrown away.
Page 37 - As no one who knows what he is about in good company, would venture to talk all ; so no author who understands the just boundaries of decorum and good-breeding, would presume to think all : the truest respect which you can pay to the reader's understanding, is to halve this matter amicably, and leave him something to imagine, in his turn, as well as yourself.
Page 291 - GOOD people all, of every sort, Give ear unto my song, And if you find it wondrous short, It cannot hold you long. In Islington there was a man, Of whom the world might say, That still a godly race he ran, Whene'er he went to pray. A kind and gentle heart he had, To comfort friends and foes ; The naked every day he clad, When he put on his clothes. And in that town a dog was found, As many dogs there be, Both mongrel, puppy, whelp, and hound, And curs of low degree. This dog and man at first were...
Page 291 - An ELEGY on the DEATH of a MAD DOG. GOOD people all, of every sort, Give ear unto my song; And if you find it wondrous short, It cannot hold you long. In Islington there was a man, Of whom the world might say, That still a godly race he ran, Whene'er he went to pray. A kind and gentle heart he had, To comfort friends and foes; The naked every day he clad, When he put on his clothes. And in that town a dog was found, As many dogs there be, Both mongrel, puppy, whelp, and hound, And curs of low degree....
Page xxviii - I was dressed, and found that his landlady had arrested him for his rent, at which he was in a violent passion. I perceived that he had already changed my guinea, and had got a bottle of Madeira and a glass before him. I put the cork into the bottle, desired he would be calm, and began to talk to him of the means by which he might be extricated. He then told me that he had a novel ready for the press, which he produced to me. I looked into it, and saw its merit ; told the landlady I should soon return...
Page 140 - Trim, said my uncle Toby. I remember, said my uncle Toby, sighing again, the story of the Ensign and his wife, with a circumstance his modesty omitted ; and particularly well that he, as well as she, upon some account or other (I forget what) was universally pitied by the whole regiment ; but finish the story thou art upon. "Tis finished already, said the Corporal, for I could stay no longer; so wished his Honour a good night. Young Le Fevre rose from off the bed, and saw me to the...
Page 341 - He must divest himself of the prejudices of his age and country ; he must consider right and wrong in their abstracted and invariable state ; he must disregard present laws and opinions, and rise to general and transcendental truths, which will always be the same : he must therefore content himself with the slow progress of his name ; contemn the applause of his own time, and commit his claims to the justice of posterity. He must write as the interpreter of nature and the legislator of mankind, and...

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