Exercises in French composition (Google eBook)

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Page 4 - I began to think seriously of matrimony, and chose my wife as she did her wedding-gown, not for a fine, glossy surface, but such qualities as would wear well. To do her justice, she was a good-natured, notable woman; and as for breeding, there were few country ladies who could show more.
Page 80 - And heavier fall: so should I purchase dear Short intermission bought with double smart. This knows my punisher; therefore as far From granting he, as I from begging peace...
Page 5 - ... life, that the poorer the guest the better pleased he ever is with being treated ; and as some men gaze with admiration at the colours of a tulip, or the wing of a butterfly, so I was by nature an admirer of happy human faces.
Page 79 - Me miserable! which way shall I fly Infinite wrath, and infinite despair ? Which way I fly is hell; myself am hell; And, in the lowest deep, a lower deep Still threatening to devour me opens wide, To which the hell I suffer seems a heaven.
Page 5 - As we lived near the road, we often had the traveller or stranger visit us to taste our gooseberry wine, for which we had great reputation ; and I profess, with the veracity of an historian, that I never knew one of them find fault with it.
Page 79 - Omnipotent. Ay me! they little know How dearly I abide that boast so vain; Under what torments inwardly I groan, While they adore me on the Throne of Hell With diadem and sceptre high advanced, The lower still I fall, only supreme In misery: such joy ambition finds.
Page 76 - Th' ethereal mountain, and the distant main. But why so far excursive ? when at hand, Along these blushing borders, bright with dew, And in yon mingled wilderness of...
Page 12 - To extricate himself from the stirrups and fallen steed was to the Templar scarce the work of a moment; and stung with madness, both at his disgrace and at the acclamations with which it was hailed by the spectators, he drew his sword and waved it in defiance of his conqueror. The Disinherited Knight sprung from his steed, and also unsheathed his sword. The marshals of the field, however, spurred their horses between them, and reminded them that the laws of the tournament did not, on the present...
Page 164 - A History of Greece from the Earliest Times to the Roman Conquest With Supplementary Chapters on the History of Literature and Art. By WILLIAM SMITH, LL.D., Editor of the Dictionaries of "Greek and Roman Antiquities," "Biography and Mythology," and
Page 80 - What feign'd submission swore : ease would recant Vows made in pain as violent and void. For never can true reconcilement grow Where wounds of deadly hate have pierced so deep...

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