A Teacher's Guide to Change: Understanding, Navigating, and Leading the Process

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Jan Stivers, Sharon F. Cramer
SAGE, Jul 30, 2009 - Education - 154 pages
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Change in education is inevitable. Throughout their careers, teachers will face a myriad of changes, both inside and outside of the classroom. This valuable professional development resource demonstrates how K-12 teachers can anticipate and respond to change in creative, advantageous ways that can enhance their career satisfaction and effectiveness as professionals.

Emphasizing that change is something teachers can understand, manage, become invested in, and even champion, the authors provide practical skills for facing and adjusting to change, whether it is mandated or a personal choice. Offering a wealth of conceptual, reflective, interpersonal, and strategic tools, this guide also includes:

- Reflections from a survey of 100 teachers who share their experiences with change as well as advice and encouragement, inviting educators to learn from each other

- A five-step process for initiating and implementing plans for change

- Research-based strategies for leading change, both in smaller and larger spheres of influence

- Vivid examples that can be directly applied to personal experience

Reflective exercises to assist teachers in understanding and approaching change

This accessible resource is invaluable for both new and experienced teachers. Whether or not change is voluntary, opportunities for professional growth are abundant, leading to improved student learning and greater teacher retention.

  

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User Review  - davidloertscher - LibraryThing

It is fascinating to watch a consensus begin to develop about how things need to change, but when the reality comes the reality. It is easy to watch others change as long as things donít change for ... Read full review

Contents

What Changes? Experiencing Change at School and at Home
7
Defining the Dynamics of Change for Teachers
25
UNDERSTANDING THE CHANGE PROCESS
35
Charting the Stages of Change
49
IMPLEMENTING CHANGE
61
TeacherDirected Change Working Within the Classroom
79
LEADING CHANGE
89
Using ClassroomBased Skills to Lead Change
105
CHANGING THROUGHOUT A TEACHING CAREER
117
Survey Items and Responses
129
Interview Questions
137
References
143
Index
149
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Janet L. Stivers is associate professor of special education at Marist College, School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, member of the Board of Directors of the Northeastern Educational Research Association, and member of the Board of Directors of Literacy Volunteer of America, Dutchess Community Chapter. Stivers frequently present workshops for teams of middle and high school teachers who are collaborating to teach students with special needs in general education classes.

She has a PhD in educational psychology and statistics at the State University of New York at Albany and recieved her MA in psychology and counseling from Assumption College. Stivers has been teaching at Marist College since 1980 and has won the Social and Behavioral Sciences Faculty of the Year Award, 2002.

Sharon F. Cramer is a distinguished service professor at Buffalo State College, where she has been a member of the faculty since 1985. Her leadership roles include serving as executive director of the SABRE Project (implementation of the Oracle Student Information System) (1999-2004), chairing the Exceptional Education Department (1995-1999), and leadership roles in state and national professional organizations (e.g., president of the Northeastern Educational Research Association, NY Federation of Chapters of the Council for Exceptional Children, publication chair of the Division on Developmental Disabilities).

She earned her PhD at New York University in 1984 in human relations and social policy, her master of arts in teaching (MAT) from Harvard University in 1972, and her bachelors of arts degree from Tufts University in 1971. She participated in the Management and Leadership Education (MLE) program at Harvard University in 2001.

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