Fort Western on the Kennebec: The Story of Its Construction in 1754 and what Has Happened There (Google eBook)

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Gannett, 1922 - 59 pages
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Early history of Maine/then Massachusetts from 1750s. Building of Fort Western. Gershom Flagg architect. Benedict Arnold. Aaron Burr. Paul Revere. Governor Shirley. (ie their deeds before 1775 era.)

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Pages 4 and 5 of the book are missing.

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Page 13 - Government; and will piquet in the same, at thirty feet distant from every part of the house, and build a blockhouse, of twenty-four feet square, at two of the opposite angles, agreeable to a plan exhibited by...
Page 23 - The men in general seems very low in spirits, which I impute to their wading so much in ye water in ye summer and fall, which I believe has very much hurt ye circulation of their blood and filled it full of gross...
Page 6 - Kenebeck; and so it came to pass in time, though at first it stuck, & it was 2. years before they could put of this small quantity, till ye inland people knew of it; and afterwards they could scarce ever gett enough for them, for many years togeather. And...
Page 17 - Norridgewalk is considerably difficult by reason of the rapidity of the stream and rippling falls, but tis' likely will be much easier when the water is higher. There is but one fall above the Teconnet Falls that is necessary to carry the battoes around before we come to Norridgewalk, betwixt which, and the carrying 'place the navigation is vastly better than below, there being only two falls to carry round, one of which notwithstanding it is a mile in length, there is a plain beaten path ; the other...
Page 15 - Governor, arrived here from Falmouth in Casco Bay, by whom we have the following account, viz : That the forces under General Winslow set out from Teconnett with something more than 500 men and 15 battoes, on the eighth of August past, but after proceeding two days up the river, the General was taken so ill that he was obliged to return, leaving the command, with the instructions to him, with Col.
Page 16 - Preble that they had nothing to fear from him, that none of his men should hurt the least thing they had, nor go into their houses, and that Governor Shirley had ordered they should be treated with civility and kindness, they appeared well satisfied and were kind and friendly ; and Passequeant, one of their chiefs, presented him with two fine salmon, and some squashes of their own produce, and were all very free in drinking King George's and Governor Shirley's health, and told him he was welcome...
Page 16 - Indians were much surprised on discovering the party, and endeavoured to return up the river with their canoes, but the rapidity of the stream prevented their speedy flight, on which they run the canoes on shore, on the opposite side of the river, catched one of them up and ran off into the woods, leaving the other two on the spot, and made their escape to the carrying place, and so returned to Canada, to carry intelligence, as Col. Preble supposed, for he tracked...
Page 17 - English, hoped we should take no notice of it, that they were determined to live in friendship with us; and if the Canada Indians had any design to do any mischief on our frontiers, they would certainly let us know it ; and if any disputes arose betwixt the French and us they were determined for the future to sit still and smoke their pipes. The Colonel told them the resolution they had taken would be very pleasing to Governor Shirley, and as long as they kept their faith with us they might depend...
Page 12 - I shall think fit;' and whereas the placing such a new fort upon this occasion, near Taconett Falls, would contribute more to the defense of the said river and protection of the settlements which already are, or shall hereafter be made upon it, than erecting a fort at or near Cushenac, but would be attended with this inconvenience, that the depth of water in said river will not admit provisions and stores to be transported in a sloop, higher than Cushenac; so that it is necessary, in case a fort...
Page 12 - GENTLEMEN :—The Great and General Assembly of this Province, having in their present session, by their message to me, desired that I would order a 'fort to be erected, of about one hundred and twenty feet square, as far up the Kennebec, above Richmond Fort, as I shall think fit...

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