Marie Antoinette

Front Cover
Rizzoli, Oct 10, 2006 - Performing Arts - 144 pages
2 Reviews
Based on the book Marie-Antoinette: The Journey by Antonia Fraser, Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette is a powerful and sympathetic film of the tragic life of France's iconic and misunderstood eighteenth-century Queen. Shot entirely in France, much on location at the Palace of Versailles, the film is visually stunning, bringing together a cast that includes Kirsten Dunst, Jason Schwartzman, Rip Torn, and Marianne Faithful, and the extraordinary costume designs of Oscar-winner Milena Canonero (Barry Lyndon, A Clockwork Orange).
A moving story of naivety and responsibility, reputation and misunderstanding, Marie Antoinette is a film that Sofia Coppola has wanted to make for years. In a book that is at once the personal chronicle of a major work and a beautiful tribute to the potential of film, featuring elements of the director's own screenplay as well as captivating stills, the director's personal photos, and original designs for costumes and sets, Marie Antoinette is an essential companion for any lover of modern cinema.

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Review: Marie Antoinette

User Review  - Kelsey Haywood - Goodreads

love this screenplay and movie! Read full review

Review: Marie Antoinette

User Review  - Patricia Dourado - Goodreads

Amazings screenplay and pictures! Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
23
Section 3
29
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Sofia Coppola is regarded as one of the leading writer-directors of her generation. By turns screenwriter, producer, and director, she has created some of the most powerful and beautiful films of recent years, from her adaptation of Jeffrey Eugenides' The Virgin Suicides to the Academy Award-winning Lost in Translation, for which Coppola's original screenplay took an Oscar in 2003. Sofia Coppola's films have earned her a reputation that transcends the barriers between cult and mainstream cinema.

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