Citizenship and Ethnicity: The Growth and Development of a Democratic Multiethnic Institution (Google eBook)

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1999 - Political Science - 144 pages
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Today, all industrialized states are multinational. However, as Political Sociologist Feliks Gross points out, there remains considerable debate and experimentation on how to organize a multiethnic, democratic, and humane state. Gross examines various types of multiethnic states as well as their early origins and prospects for success. In the past, minorities were usually formed as a consequence of conquest or migration; minorities tended to have an inferior status, subordinated to the ruling, dominant ethnic class.

While Athens provides an early example of a state formed by alliance and association, the Romans advanced this concept when they extended to subjected peoples the status by means of citizenship. After the fall of Rome, citizenship continued in Italian and other continental cities. In England, subjectship associated with individual freedom had native roots. The American and French Revolutions revived and created the modern definition of citizenship. Along with Rome, however, only the United States provides an example of a successful multiethnic state of continental dimensions.

  

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Contents

THE MULTIETHNIC STATE THE WAY IT BEGAN
1
THE ROOTS OF CITIZENSHIP ATHENS AND ROME
19
CITIZENSHIP SURVIVES IN THE CITIES OF EUROPE
51
UNFOLDING OF DEMOCRATIC CITIZENSHIP
69
CONCLUDING COMMENTS
125
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
135
INDEX
139
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

FELIKS GROSS is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the Graduate School and Brooklyn College, City University of New York, honorary president of CUNY Academy for Humanities and Sciences.

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