Plutarch, His Life, His Parallel Lives, and His Morals (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Macmillan and Company, 1874 - 163 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 69 - If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle : I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on : 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent; That day he overcame the " Nervii: Look, in this place ran Cassius...
Page 75 - With solemn touches troubled thoughts, and chase Anguish and doubt and fear and sorrow and pain From mortal or immortal minds.
Page 167 - War. Third Edition, Enlarged. Fcap. 8vo, 4?. Plutarch ; his Life, his Lives, and his Morals. Second Edition, Enlarged. Fcap. 8vo, 3*. 6d. Remains of the late Mrs. Richard Trench. Being Selections from her Journals, Letters, and other Papers. New and Cheaper Issue. With Portrait. 8vo, 6s.
Page 166 - The Fitness of Holy Scripture for Unfolding the Spiritual Life of Man : Christ the Desire of all Nations ; or, the Unconscious Prophecies of Heathendom. Hulsean Lectures.
Page 168 - The Sermon on the Mount. An Exposition drawn from the Writings of St. Augustine, with an Essay on his Merits as an Interpreter of Holy Scripture. Fourth Edition, Enlarged.
Page 75 - In perfect phalanx to the Dorian mood Of flutes and soft recorders; such as raised To highth of noblest temper heroes old Arming to battle; and instead of rage Deliberate valour breathed, firm and unmoved With dread of death to flight or foul retreat; Nor wanting power to mitigate and swage With solemn touches troubled thoughts, and chase Anguish, and doubt, and fear, and sorrow, and pain, From mortal or immortal minds.
Page 134 - I can hardly be without Plutarch; he is so universal, and so full, that upon all occasions, and what extravagant subject soever you take in hand, he will still be at your elbow, and hold out to you a liberal and not to be exhausted hand of riches and embellishments.
Page 89 - Haunts, with sad echoes, musing Fancy's ear : Ah ! that a Conqueror's words should be so dear : Ah ! that a boon could shed such rapturous joys ! A gift of that which is not to be given By all the blended powers of Earth and Heaven.
Page 72 - Caesar sent unto her ran thither in all haste possible, and found the soldiers standing at the gate, mistrusting nothing, nor understanding of her death. But when they had opened the doors they found Cleopatra stark dead, laid upon a bed of gold, attired and arrayed in her royal robes, and one of her two women, which was called Iras, dead at her feet; and her other woman called Charmion half dead, and trembling, trimming the diadem which Cleopatra ware upon her head. One of the soldiers, seeing her,...
Page 37 - It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have left nothing worth defending; and to give the name of peace to desolation.

Bibliographic information