Growth of the Soil (Google eBook)

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NuVision Publications, LLC, 1966 - Norway - 435 pages
15 Reviews
  

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Review: Growth of the Soil

User Review  - Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly - Goodreads

Get this edition. On the front cover is a young man walking on plowed ground. Above is the book's modest title, "Growth of the Soil," and in smaller case "Knut Hamsun's Greatest Novel." Open it and ... Read full review

Review: Growth of the Soil

User Review  - Kelly - Goodreads

I really enjoyed this book. The story is so simplistic, -- not really having a big plot to it. It is the story of Isak, a man who is literally walking through the forest one day, and chooses a spot ... Read full review

Contents

I
7
II
14
III
21
IV
29
V
39
VI
47
VII
59
VIII
69
XVII
152
XVIII
163
XIX
176
XX
187
XXI
199
XXII
211
XXIII
223
XXIV
236

IX
78
X
87
XI
95
XII
103
XIII
112
XIV
120
XV
131
XVI
141
XXV
260
XXVI
274
XXVII
283
XXVIII
294
XXIX
306
XXX
318
Copyright

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Page 10 - twas lighter and brighter now in every way. And then at last came help; the woman he needed. She tacked about for a long time, this way and that across the hillside, before venturing near; it was evening before she could bring herself to come down. And then she came a big, brown-eyed girl, full-built and coarse, with good, heavy hands, and rough hide brogues on her feet as if she had been a Lapp, and a calfskin bag slung from her shoulders. Not altogether young; speaking politely; somewhere nearing...
Page 7 - The long, long road over the moors and up into the forest who trod it into being first of all? Man, a human being, the first that came here. There was no path before he came. Afterward, some beast or other, following the faint tracks over marsh and moorland, wearing them deeper; after these again some Lapp gained scent of the path, and took that way from field to field, looking to his reindeer. Thus was made the road through the great Almenning the common tracts without an owner ; no-man's-land....
Page 28 - ... stones; ploughing, manuring, harrowing, working with pick and spade, breaking lumps of soil and crumbling them with hand and heel; a tiller of the ground always, laying out fields like velvet carpets. He waited a couple of days longer there was a look of rain about and then he sowed his corn. For generations back, into forgotten time, his fathers before him had sowed corn; solemnly, on a still, calm evening, best with a gentle fall of warm and misty rain, soon after the grey goose flight....
Page 28 - Grain was nothing less than bread; grain or no grain meant life or death. Isak walked bareheaded, in Jesu name, a sower. Like a tree-stump with hands to look at, but in his heart like a child. Every cast was made with care, in a spirit of kindly resignation. Look! the tiny grains that are to take life and grow, shoot up into ears, and give more grain again; so it is throughout all the earth where grain is sown.
Page 18 - Poor Inger, not so eternally wise as he, as Isak, that lord of creation. And this was before she learned to know him, and reckon with his way of putting things. Says Inger: "Why, it's never a cowshed you're building, surely?

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