The Brown Fairy Book

Front Cover
Andrew Lang
Courier Dover Publications, 1965 - Juvenile Fiction - 350 pages
7 Reviews
The Brown Fairy book is a delectable assortment of adventures from all over the world. Stories came from Persia, Australia, Africa; others originated in Brazil, India, New Caledonia, and other lands. One tells of a witch who used a magic ball to steal children (Ball-Carrier and the Bad One); another takes place at a time when birds were men and men were birds (Pivi and Kabo); a third deals with the magic world of gnomes and water nympths (Rubezahl). Exotic tales from far-away places, the stories here are different enough to captivate the young imagination; familiar enough so that boys and girls everywhere will listen and understand.
  

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Review: The Brown Fairy Book (Coloured Fairy Books #9)

User Review  - Kaila - Goodreads

I do not think I could ever get tired of read the Fairy Books by Andrew Lang. Read full review

Review: The Brown Fairy Book (Coloured Fairy Books #9)

User Review  - CKE387 - Goodreads

This is a fairy tale book focusing on tales from Persia, Australia, Africa, India, New Caledonia, Brazil and Pre-Colonial Americas. I liked the following stories: Father Grumbler Fortune and the Wood ... Read full review

Contents

What the Bose did to the Cgpren
1
Prince Almas Transformed to face p
20
The Punishment of the Rose
36
BallCarrier and the Bad One
48
The Bunyip
71
The Story of the Yam
88
The Turtle and his Bride
106
Hdbogi
126
The Sister of the Sun
215
The Prince and the Three Fates
233
The Princess and the Snake
238
The Fox and the Lapp
245
Kiaa he Cat
256
The Iion and the Cat
263
Which wan the Foohiaheat 1
270
Riibezahl and the Princess
290

Hcibogis Horses
128
The Sacred Milk of Koumongoé
143
The Husband of the Rats Daughter
161
Listen listen said the Mermaid to
178
Pivi and Kabo
183
How Some Wild Animals became Tame Ones
197
Biibezrzhl
300
Story of Wali Déd the Simplehearted
315
Tale of a Tortoise and of a Mischievous Monkey
327
The Knights of the Fish
343
The Dragon and the Mirror
346
Copyright

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About the author (1965)

Andrew Lang was born at Selkirk in Scotland on March 31, 1844. He was a historian, poet, novelist, journalist, translator, and anthropologist, in connection with his work on literary texts. He was educated at Edinburgh Academy, St. Andrews University, and Balliol College, Oxford University, becoming a fellow at Merton College. His poetry includes Ballads and Lyrics of Old France (1872), Ballades in Blue China (1880--81), and Grass of Parnassus (1888--92). His anthropology and his defense of the value of folklore as the basis of religion is expressed in his works Custom and Myth (1884), Myth, Ritual and Religion (1887), and The Making of Religion (1898). He also translated Homer and critiqued James G. Frazer's views of mythology as expressed in The Golden Bough. He was considered a good historian, with a readable narrative style and knowledge of the original sources including his works A History of Scotland (1900-7), James VI and the Gowrie Mystery (1902), and Sir George Mackenzie (1909). He was one of the most important collectors of folk and fairy tales. His collections of Fairy books, including The Blue Fairy Book, preserved and handed down many of the better-known folk tales from the time. He died of angina pectoris on July 20, 1912.

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