The Life of Abdel Kader, Ex-sultan of the Arabs of Algeria: Written from His Own Dictation, and Comp. from Other Authentic Sources (Google eBook)

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Chapman and Hall, 1867 - Algeria - 331 pages
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Page 152 - WASHINGTON ; a triumphant warrior, where the most sanguine had a right to despair ; a successful ruler in all the difficulties of a course wholly untried ; but a warrior whose sword only left its sheath when the first law of our nature commanded it to be drawn ; and a ruler who, having tasted of supreme power, gently and unostentatiously desired that the draught might pass from him, nor would suffer more to wet his lips than the most solemn and sacred duty to his country and his God required.
Page ix - Time hath, my lord, a wallet at his back, Wherein he puts alms for oblivion, A great-sized monster of ingratitudes: Those scraps are good deeds past; which are devour'd As fast as they are made, forgot as soon As done...
Page 317 - he exclaimed, ' is this the way you honour the Prophet ? May his curses be upon you ! Shame upon you, shame. You will yet live to repent. You think you may do as you please with the Christians, but the day of retribution will come. The Franks will yet turn your mosques into churches. Not a Christian will I give up. They are my brothers. Stand back, or I will give my men the order to fire.
Page 137 - Noted for his liberality, he spent his own surplus of income year by year, in assisting the poor, the traveller especially, and those who had been disabled in the war. His military code has this paragraph concerning himself : " II Hadgi Abd-el-Kader cares not for this world, and withdraws from it as much as his avocations will permit. He despises wealth and riches. He lives with the greatest plainness and sobriety. He is always simply clad. He rises in the middle of the night to recommend his own...
Page 152 - Washington ; a triumphant warrior where the most sanguine had a right to despair ; a successful ruler in all the difficulties of a course wholly untried ; but a warrior, whose sword only left its sheath when the first law of our nature commanded it to be drawn; and a ruler who, having tasted of supreme power, gently and unostentatiously desired that the cup might pass from him, nor would suffer more to wet his lips than the most solemn and sacred duty to his Country and his God required...
Page 318 - ... viewed him patiently submitting to adverse fortune, going cheerfully into exile, and devoting his splendid gifts of mind and soul to the spiritual improvement of his race. But Providence had reserved him to be the protector of Christians. Strange and unparalleled destiny ; he, an Arab, was to throw his guardian aegis over the outraged majesty of Europe ; a descendant of the Prophet was to shelter and protect the spouse of Christ. The Christians of Syria, who form already a great and constantly...
Page 127 - My predecessors, who dwelt in this city, ruled from Tunis to Morocco, and I will restore it to its ancient splendour ; I will gather together the tribes in this place, where we shall be secure from the attacks of the French, and when all my forces are collected I will descend from this steep rock like a vulture from his nest, and drive the Christians out of Algiers, Oran and Bona : if, indeed, you were content with those three cities I would suffer you to remain there, for the sea is not mine and...
Page 318 - Beyrout under protection of his men. He was at length enabled to repose. He had rescued twelve thousand souls belonging to the Christians from death, and worse than death, by his fearless courage, his unwearied activity, and his catholicminded zeal. All the representatives of the Christian powers then residing in Damascus had owed their lives to him. Thus was the most chivalrous act of the nineteenth century consummated. The civilized world acknowledged the grandeur of the deed, and sent him marks...
Page 127 - ... gather together the tribes in this place, where we shall be secure from the attacks of the French, and when all my forces are collected I will descend from this steep rock like a vulture from his nest, and drive the Christians out of Algiers, Oran and Bona: if, indeed, you were content with those three cities I would suffer you to remain there, for the sea is not mine and I have no ships ; but you want our plains and our inland cities, and our mountains; nay, you even covet our horses, our tents,...
Page 291 - ... a point as to fail in its promise. Generosity is always the best counsellor, and I am convinced that your residence in Turkey will not prove injurious to the tranquillity of our possessions in Africa. Your religion, like ours, enjoins submission to the decrees of Providence.

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Internet Archive: Details: The life of Abdel Kader, ex-sultan of ...
The life of Abdel Kader, ex-sultan of the Arabs of Algeria; written from his own dictation, and comp. from other authentic sources. By Colonel Churchill. ...
www.archive.org/ details/ lifeofabdelkader00churuoft

Hedi Abdel-Jaouad - The Sands of Rhyme: Thackeray and Abd al Qadir ...
In this context, it is interesting to note that the Emir's first authoritative biography, The Life of Abdel Kader, Ex-Sultan of the Arabs of Algeria (1867) ...
muse.jhu.edu/ journals/ research_in_african_literatures/ v030/ 30.3abdel-jaouad.html

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