Searching for Stars: Stardom and Screen Acting in British Cinema

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A&C Black, Apr 1, 2000 - Performing Arts - 216 pages
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Explores the reasons behind British cinema's failure to create its own stars. The text looks at the way theatre and music hall spawned their stars, and asks why so many of them found the transition to film so awkward. It compares the British star system with that of Hollywood.

What sort of contracts were British stars offered? How much were they paid? Who dealt with their publicity? How did Britsh fans regard them? There are essays on key figures (Novello, Fields, Formby, Dors, Bogarde, Mason, Matthews), and assessment of how British stars fared in Hollywood, an analysis of the effects of class and regional prejudice on attempts at British star-making, and a survey of the British comedy tradition, and some of the questions about how genre affected the star system.
  

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Contents

1 Of Knights and Clowns
1
Ivor Novello and Betty Balfour
34
3 The King the Queen and the Dancing Divinity
59
4 Carnival and Consensus
83
5 Stock Types
104
6 Exotic Outsiders
143
7 Lockwood Calvert and Some Other Contract Artists
154
8 Starmakers
172
9 The End of the Studio System
201
Bibliography
208
Index
211
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Geoffrey Macnab is a film writer who contributes to Sight and Sound, Moving Pictures International, and Time Out. He is the author of J. Arthur Rank and the British Film Industry.

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