Plant Inventory -, Issues 51-60 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
The Department, 1922 - Plant introduction
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Page 43 - The durion grows on a large and lofty forest-tree, somewhat resembling an elm in its general character, but with a more smooth and scaly bark. The fruit is round or slightly oval, about the size of a large cocoanut, of a green color, and covered all over with short stout spines, the bases of which touch each other, and are consequently somewhat hexagonal, while the points are very strong and sharp.
Page 44 - It would not, perhaps, be correct to say that the durion is the best of all fruits, because it cannot supply the place of the subacid juicy kinds, such as the orange, grape, mango, and mangosteen, whose refreshing and cooling qualities are so wholesome and grateful; but as producing a food of the most exquisite flavor it is unsurpassed.
Page 46 - THE yellow birch is confined to our cool, high mountain slopes, generally at greater elevations than the black birch, from which it can usually be distinguished by its bark. It is a large tree, often with a short or crooked trunk, occasionally reaching a height of 100 feet and a diameter of 4 feet. The bark on the trunk and large branches is silvery or yellow-gray, with thin papery layers sepaTBLLOW BIRCH One-half natural size.
Page 43 - When the fruit is ripe it falls of itself; and the only way to eat durions in perfection is to get them as they fall, and the smell is then less overpowering. When unripe, it makes a very good vegetable if cooked, and it is also eaten by the Dyaks raw. In a good fruit season large quantities . are preserved salted, in jars and bamboos, and kept the year round; when it acquires a most disgusting odor to Europeans, but the Dyaks appreciate it highly as a relish with their rice.
Page 43 - It is neither acid, nor sweet, nor juicy; yet one feels the want of none of these qualities, for it is perfect as it is. It produces no nausea or other bad effect, and the more you eat of it the less you feel inclined to stop. In fact to eat Durians is a new sensation, worth a voyage to the East to experience.
Page 43 - A rich butterlike custard highly flavored with almonds gives the best general idea of it, but intermingled with it come wafts of flavor that call to mind cream-cheese, onion-sauce, brown sherry, and other incongruities. Then there is a rich glutinous smoothness in the pulp which nothing else possesses, but which adds to its delicacy. It is neither acid, nor sweet, nor juicy, yet one feels the want of none of these qualities...
Page 43 - ... the points are very strong and sharp. It is so completely armed, that if the stalk is broken off it is a difficult matter to lift one from the ground. The outer rind is so thick and tough, that from whatever height it may fall it is never broken. From the base to the apex five very faint lines may be traced, over which the spines arch a little ; these...
Page 26 - Fruits abundantly produced, ovoid to globose, 1 to 1\ inches long, 1 to lj inches across; epicarp membranous, russet-brown, more or less clothed with villous hairs. Flesh green, of most excellent flavor, to my palate akin to that of the gooseberry, but tempered with a flavor peculiarly its own. The fruit is excellent when fresh, and also makes very fine jam and sauce.
Page 78 - Bush cherry. A broad, vigorous shrub, from northern China ; one of the earliest cherries to flower. The flowers are large, with the white petals more or less tinged with red toward the base; the small bright-red, slightly hairy fruits are of good flavor. (Adapted from Arnold Arboretum Bulletin of Popular Information, No. 19.) " The plant thrives and fruits abundantly from Georgia to Camilla. The ripe fruits make a delicious jelly.
Page 40 - Nutrient value 92 The nuts were tested for alkaloids and glucosides, but no indication of the presence of such constituents was obtained. The results of the analysis indicate that the nuts are likely to prove a useful food-stuff. A satisfactory point is the presence of considerable quantities of sugars and oil in addition to the carbohydrates. Judging from the analytical figures alone, the nutrient ratio, ie the ratio of albuminoids to carbohydrates and oil converted into their starch equivalents,...

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